Based On Science

Metabolic Balance is a personalized nutrition program that is based on your personal blood values. The foods recommended therefore contain the nutrients that are customized to your body. If the body is sufficiently supplied with protein and all important micronutrients, you will start to feel better and have more energy to move your body. Sufficient protein also ensures muscle growth and tone your body. Not only will you feel better and have more energy but you will also start to see the results!

Rhubarb Soup

Although rhubarb is often associated with sweet foods, rhubarb is also delicious in savory dishes.

Ingredients:
1 serving of chicken
1 serving of vegetables (rhubarb, carrots and onions)
3/4 cup (200 mL) vegetable stock
Salt and pepper 

Preparation:
Cut the chicken into cubes. Cut the onions and rhubarb into slices. Peel the carrots and cut into cubes. Cook the chicken meat briefly in the pan, add the onions and cook for 5-10 minutes. Deglaze with vegetable stock. Add the carrots and rhubarb, allow to simmer for about 25 minutes and then season to taste with salt and pepper. Enjoy!

Health and Nutrition

Healthy eating reduces the risk of chronic diseases and food intolerances. In addition, more than 70 percent of all diseases are diet-related. Above all, the risk of obesity, cardiovascular diseases and diabetes is drastically reduced if you eat healthier. It’s actually a very simple calculation, don’t you think? Metabolic Balance provides you the structure and support to get on track and live a healthy life.

Personalized To You

Metabolic Balance is for people to be unique. It’s for people to be their best selves. It’s for people like you to find out which food suits them and feel the best they can feel. Your food creates you so it’s no surprise that when it’s wrong, you don’t feel your best and your body and mind struggles to work. This is when symptoms happen, problems begin and poor health follows. At Metabolic Balance we believe with the right nutrients from your food, every person is able to have the potential to be as healthy as is possible for them. Your food is the best medicine you can take or the slowest form of poison. So which is it going to be for you? Let our analysis find your best foods for you and your body can do the rest. Find your Metabolic Balance practitioner today and live your best life!

Credit: Metabolic Balance Australia and New Zealand

Rhubarb Parfait

This combination of strawberries and rhubarb is a classic and absolutely delicious!

Ingredients:
1 serving of rhubarb
1 serving of cottage cheese
1 serving of fruit (we recommend strawberries)

Preparation:

Simply steam the rhubarb in some water for a few minutes. Alternately, layer cottage cheese, rhubarb and strawberries and enjoy.

Rhubarb

Although many of us think of rhubarb as a fruit and use the stems similar to other fruits such as in a jam, compote, chutney or in cake, rhubarb is considered a vegetable.

Rhubarb is incredibly healthy and fits perfectly with Metabolic Balance. It contains large amounts of vitamin K and C, potassium, and calcium. This vegetable is also packed full of malic acids, various glycosides, tannins, essential oils and pectin which can be soothing for the intestine. Rhubarb is perfect for “internal cleansing”. The contained anthraquinones strongly stimulate the digestive system and have a laxative effect.

Cholesterol under control!

Cholesterol is essential for human life. It is not only a necessary component of cell membranes, but also an important starting material for the production of sex hormones in the adrenal grands, ovaries and testicles. In addition, vitamin D, which is so important for our metabolism, is formed from cholesterol under the skin. Most cholesterol is needed for the production of bile acid in the liver. Due to the many functions of cholesterol in the body, it is also able to produce cholesterol itself. This means that 90% of the daily amount of cholesterol needed is produced by the liver. In contrast, only 10% of total cholesterol is absorbed with food.

Cholesterol is a fat-like substance and, like triglycerides and long-chain fatty acids, is insoluble in water, i. e. it cannot circulate freely in the blood (blood consists of 70% water). Therefore, the fats are transferred to a water-soluble form, the so-called lipoproteins.

The exogenous metabolic pathway
Dietary fats absorbed through the intestine – cholesterol, triglycerides and long-chain fatty acids – are packed in lipoprotein shells in the intestinal wall and thus enter the vascular system via the lymph channels. From there they are distributed throughout the body. With the help of enzymes, triglycerides and individual fatty acids are broken down, which are needed for energy production and various metabolic processes. The remaining residual particles are absorbed by the liver.

The endogenous metabolic pathway
The liver produces various lipoproteins from the residual particles, among other things LDL cholesterol. The LDL is absorbed into the cells via special LDL receptors found on almost all cell types and thus removed from the bloodstream. Unfortunately, the absorption of LDL cholesterol into cells is not unlimited. If the supply of cholesterol from the blood exceeds the needs of the cells, the LDL receptors on the cell surface are reduced and the cells absorb less and less LDL cholesterol from the blood.
As a result, a large part of the LDL cholesterol present in the blood oxidizes and is absorbed by the immune system’s scavenger cells (macrophages). So-called “foam cells” are formed, which contain large amounts of cholesterol. Over time, these cells die off and release cholesterol crystals, which promote the deposition of plaques in damaged vessels – arteriosclerosis develops.

HDL cholesterol is formed in the intestine and liver as well as in the blood while metabolizing other lipoproteins. These can – and this distinguishes them from other lipoproteins present in the blood – absorb oxidized LDL cholesterol and transport it back to the liver, where it is then used to produce bile acids.

Primary and secondary lipometabolic disorders
Approximately 30 percent of diagnosed hypercholesterolaemia are primary or familial hypercholesterolaemia. Primary or familial hypercholesterol anaemia is attributed to a gene defect. This gene defect causes fewer LDL receptors to be formed on the cells and thus reduces the absorption of cholesterol into the cells – with the result that the LDL concentration in the blood rises rapidly. 
Often, however, an elevated cholesterol level is secondary. The reason for this may be, for example, a nutrition that is too rich in fats, which in particular contains too many saturated fatty acids and trans fatty acids. But a nutrition high in carbohydrates and low in fiber also contributes to this. Diseases such as hypothyroidism, diabetes or renal dysfunction can also cause elevated cholesterol levels. Furthermore, medication such as cortisone, antihypertensives or beta-blockers are suspected of having a negative effect on cholesterol levels.

What role does nutrition play?
Dietary and lifestyle changes are core elements of prevention and treatment of dyslipidemia.
In general, a nutrition that is simply low in cholesterol is not recommended. The cholesterol in food usually has only a small effect on blood levels. It is much more important to have a balanced nutrition in which, besides high-quality vegetable omega-3 oils, sea fish, lots of fresh vegetables, herbs, fruits, as well as high-fiber foods are on the menu.

Influence of carbohydrates on cholesterol levels
A low-carbohydrate nutrition has a positive effect on blood lipid levels and cholesterol. This was observed by scientists in a study of nearly 180 overweight middle-aged men. In the subjects who only met their energy requirements with carbohydrates for a quarter instead of a half, the harmful triglyceride levels and unhealthy LDL cholesterol in the blood already showed a decrease after three weeks. This effect was also observed if the participants did not lose weight.
The explanation for this is provided by the metabolic intermediate product acetyl-CoA. It is produced during the breakdown of carbohydrates, fats and proteins, is needed for energy production and at the same time is also the starting substance for the body’s own cholesterol synthesis. With a high consumption of carbohydrates, especially those with a high glycemic load, more acetyl-CoA molecules are formed, which then stimulate cholesterol formation when no energy is needed, for example in the form of exercise and activity.

Vegetables – cholesterol-lowering
Fiber-rich foods, which are mainly rich in soluble fiber, such as apples, pulses and oats, have a positive influence on LDL levels. Their direct effectiveness is mainly based on their ability to bind bile acids in the intestine and excrete them. The more bile acids are bound and disposed of in the intestine by the soluble fiber, the less cholesterol is reabsorbed into the bloodstream. As a result, the liver removes more cholesterol from the bloodstream for the production of bile acid – the level of LDL cholesterol in the blood drops.

In addition to soluble fiber, plant foods also offer a special group of bioactive substances, the so-called plant sterols (phytosterols). These are particularly useful in reducing the absorption of cholesterol from the intestines into the bloodstream.
Plant sterols compete on the micelles in the small intestine with the absorption of cholesterol, so that cholesterol in the presence of plant sterols is increasingly excreted in the stool. This also means that less cholesterol is absorbed into the body, whether it is food cholesterol or the cholesterol that enters the intestines with bile acid. Plant sterols are found naturally in vegetable oils, pumpkin seeds, sunflower seeds or pine nuts and other nuts.

In addition to abundant fiber and phytosterols, vegetable foods also provide a high proportion of other secondary plant substances (carotenoids, polyphenols, sulfides, etc. ), which may protect LDL cholesterol from oxidation. The free radicals that accumulate in the body during the metabolic process or also due to stress are absorbed by the antioxidants and thus prevent them from joining with the cholesterol-containing fat particles.

Avoid hidden fats
The quality of dietary fats also has a major influence on the concentration of lipoproteins. Neither cholesterol nor fats are “dangerous” substances, but essential to life. The problem is usually that too many fats with an unfavorable fatty acid composition are consumed. A scientific study shows that on average 70 % of the daily amount of fat is absorbed as hidden fat (e. g. in sausage, cheese, chocolate, sweet pastries, snacks etc. ). However, it is now known that the fatty acid pattern in nutrition influences the composition, size and oxidation tendency of LDL cholesterol.
Therefore, the focus should be on monounsaturated and polyunsaturated fatty acids. A wide variety of studies have shown that replacing saturated fatty acids and trans fatty acids with omega-3 fatty acids (sea fish, cold-pressed vegetable oils, walnuts, seedlings) helps to activate the LDL receptors on the cells to absorb more LDL cholesterol.

Conclusion:
With a balanced nutrition rich in vital substances, as well as by avoiding industrially processed foods and a healthy lifestyle, which means integrating exercise into everyday life and reducing stress, a secondary lipometabolic disorder can be kept in check. At the same time, other risk factors for cardiovascular diseases such as high blood pressure or blood sugar as well as obesity can be reduced.
In the Metabolic Balance metabolic program, analysis of blood values can determine whether the problem is primary or secondary hypercholesterolemia. Not only values such as total cholesterol, HDL or LDL cholesterol are decisive, but also glucose and triglyceride values must be taken into account in order to be able to make the appropriate nutrition recommendations. Simply avoiding foods high in fat and cholesterol can only reduce elevated cholesterol levels to a limited extent.

Sources:

  1. Scholz R: Medizinische Biochemie, Band 9/10 „Cholesterin, Lipoproteine und Steroidhormone“, Zuckschwerdt-Verlag
  2. Deutsche Gesellschaft für Ernährung e.V. Evidenzbasierte Leitlinie: Fettkonsum und Prävention ausgewählter ernährungsbedingter Krankheiten. Version 2015; http://www.dge.de
  3. Deutsche Gesellschaft für Ernährung e.V. Evidenzbasierte Leitlinie: Kohlenhydratzufuhr und Prävention ausgewählter ernährungsbedingter Krankheiten. Version 2011; http://www.dge.de
  4. Worm,N., Mehr Fett. Warum die etablierten Ernährungsempfehlungen nicht haltbar und potenziell gefährlich sind. Ernährung & Medizin 27 (2012)57-63
  5. Bantal, Ganapathi; George, Belinda (2012): Low density Lipoprotein cholesterol target. Changing goal posts. In: India journal of endocrinology and metabolism 16 (suppl 2), S233-5. DOI:10.4103/2230-8210.104047

Creamy Spinach

This spinach and egg combination is a quick and easy meal, perfect for breakfast or lunch!

Ingredients:
2 eggs
1 serving of spinach
1 Tbsp. of vegetable stock
Nutmeg
Salt and pepper
Fresh herbs

Preparation:
Gently poach the eggs. Wash the spinach and lightly steam in a pan until soft. Season with salt, pepper and nutmeg. Pureé the eggs with salt, pepper and some vegetable stock. Serve the sauce with the spinach. Enjoy!

Metabolic Balance Facts

An essential tool in a Metabolic Balance kitchen is a kitchen scale to weigh out your ingredients when you first start the program. One ingredient that is helpful to weigh are eggs! Often recipes call for a “large” or “medium” egg but what does that truly mean? Well we have you covered with this infographic below that gives a weight for each of the different egg sizes!