Eggplant – good to know!

Did you know that the eggplant originates from East India? In the 16th century eggplants came via Egypt and North Africa to Europe – in the Americas it made its way via Brazil at the same time. Nowadays it is loved in the northern European as well as northern American kitchen. Eggplant itself is rich in carotene, vitamins B1, B2, B3 and calcium, phosphorus, iron, copper, magnesium and potassium. It also contains bitter compounds that have a stimulating effect on all digestive organs. When cooked without spices they have an incredible mild non-descriptive taste so to enjoy eggplant at it’s best, it’s important to season well and enhance the taste with delicious spices. Traditionally basil, chives, marjoram, mint and oregano goes well with eggplant but really eggplant is delicious with any of your favorite spices! Tomorrow we bring you a yummy recipe right here – stay tuned.

MB 03-05 - Aubergine

Winter Salad with Yogurt Dressing

Radicchio, Lollo Rosso, Romaine and the likes are the classic winter salads. Right now you can buy them easily – whether at the farmer’s market, at the local health food store or in the supermarket. What is special about these winter salads is their high content of bitter substances, which are not only super healthy, but also fantastically counteract cravings for sweets. Good to eat them more often! They taste especially good with a yogurt dressing.

MB 02-05 - Raddiccio

Daikon

Have you ever tasted Daikon Radish? Daikon (大根) literally means ‘big root’. If it is on your plan – how often did you eat it? We highly recommend that you have some whenever you can. Daikon originally comes from China but has a long history with many cultures. Together with garlic and onions, daikon was highly prized by the ancient Egyptians. They believed it was an essential food that protected their workers from infections and parasites. The Romans also kept themselves healthy by eating it regularly. Ironically, they considered the root to be “impure” as they believed it caused bad breath and flatulence! Daikon radish is extremely rich in vitamin C and has an antibiotic effect due to a sulphurous oil (raphanol), various mustard oils and the bitter substances it contains.

Daikon really is the perfect food for the cold and flu season!

MB 12-28 - radish

Bitter Tasting Foods to Fight Cravings!

There’s an old German saying, “What’s bitter for the mouth, is healthy for the stomach”. And we totally agree! However many naturally bitter salad leaves and vegetables are not as bitter as they once were. Instead due to modern farming and the types of plants farmed today, many of our bitter foods are nowadays much milder, sweeter or sour.

So why is this important? 

The plant components that give a bitter taste have been increasingly researched in recent years and have been shown to have many important functions for the human bodies. For example we now know that the bitter phytochemicals have very beneficial digestive characteristics and can help support and strengthen a healthy liver. 

MB 11-11 - raddiccio

The health benefits can also start from the minute the sensitive taste buds on the tongue come into contact with bitter foods. This kick-starts a cascade of digestive benefits including the production of digestive juices in the stomach and boosting the function of both the gallbladder and the pancreas.

But what many people don’t realize is that these strongly alkaline and bitter substances act like a natural suppressant towards damaging sugary foods. The “bitter” taste naturally reduces the desire for sweet foods! So try to eat many sources of bitter foods that naturally help stop those cravings for sweets!