Roasted Vegetables

Parsnips, Brussels sprouts, and many other vegetables – are delicious when roasted in the oven. Roasting brings out a vegetable’s natural sweetness and adds a wonderful charred flavor. Simply place your vegetables together in an ovenproof dish, drizzle with oil, season with salt and pepper, and cook al dente at 350CF (180°C) – with or without cheese!
Enjoy hot or cold, as an au gratin, added to salad, or simply as a side dish!

Oyster Mushroom Recipe – so yummy!

Always tastes good: our winter vegetables with oyster mushrooms

Ingredients:
1 serving vegetables (carrot, parsnip, Brussels sprout, onion)
1 serving oyster mushrooms
Spices: 1 clove of garlic, sea salt, fresh ground pepper, caraway, paprika
Herbs: chopped parsley
75 ml vegetable stock

Preparation:
Clean and wash the vegetables. Slice carrots into rings and the parsnip into fine sticks, quarter the Brussels sprouts. Peel garlic and chop finely. Blanch the vegetables briefly in salted water. Steam onion, garlic and caraway and add the blanched vegetables.
Do not wash oyster mushrooms, just clean them with a cloth or knife. Sauté oyster mushrooms with salt, pepper and paprika (no oil). Deglaze with some vegetable stock and cook gently for 10 minutes.
Add some of the oyster mushrooms and the broth to the vegetables. Puree with a blender. Add the remaining oyster mushrooms and plenty of chopped parsley on top and serve hot.

MB 01-09 - oyster mushrooms

Born to be a Cardio Star – Brussels Sprouts!

MB 09-05-2019 (2)

Brussels Sprouts: so often not the most popular in the room, but its taste is far better than its reputation. 

The florets are walnut-sized and light to dark green. Like green cabbage, Brussels sprouts taste best harvested after the first frost when their sugar content reduces their strong taste and makes their cell structure softer. Brussels sprouts are usually eaten cooked as a side dish, but they can also be added to casseroles and soups, baked in the oven or cut very thinly and lightly sautéed or even eaten raw. Brussels sprouts have a valuable 4.7% of plant protein with amino acids that the body can utilize well. It is also an excellent source of vitamin C in winter and also contains many nutrients, namely vitamins B1, B2, B6, folic acid, iron, potassium and plenty of fiber. Brussels sprouts are used in traditional folk medicine to reduce both conditions of muscle weakness and tension, they can assist weight loss, improve constipation and acidosis and prevent atherosclerosis.  They also have an impressive amount of a well recognized anti-cancer plant chemical, glucosinolate (237 mg per 100 g of vegetables). Thus, Brussels sprouts are a star in cancer prevention too! This is a real star among vegetables!

Our Health and Immune System in Winter Times

IMG_6114The human immune system is a central component of the body’s defenses, protecting the body from invading bacteria and viruses. But not only the immune system must be supported, also the skin has an increased need for care. Cold and dry heating air remove moisture from the skin. It narrows the skin vessels, the production of sebum is reduced and the formation of the central skin barrier is shut down. As a result of this combination, the skin becomes uncomfortably dry, brittle and cracked. In order that the skin does not suffer and it radiates vitality even in the cold season, a combination of external and internal care is a “must”. Dry skin can be prevented with the help of Omega 3 fatty acids, which are abundant in sea fish and cold pressed vegetable oils such as flax seed oil and rapeseed oil (oil colza). It is also important that the fluid reservoirs are filled up and we are hydrated. Even if in winter the feeling of thirst is something sparse, we must drink enough. It is recommended to drink plenty of herbal teas, ginger water and mineral water.

In addition to the above mentioned cold-season-care, we should also ensure that the body is sufficiently supplied with vitamins. The vitamins A, C and E fight together against the cell-damaging free radicals, strengthen and support the connective tissue, prevent the skin from becoming chapped and dry. Vitamin B5 (panthothenic acid) is the vitamin that can bind moisture and give the skin a radiant complexion. Vitamin B3 enhances skin protection and relieves redness.

An ideal vitamin supplier for the cold season is cabbage, which is available harvest-fresh even in cold regions in the winter. Looking at the typical vitamin-rich winter vegetables such as Brussels sprouts and kale the first frost on the fields even enhances its taste. But beetroot, Teltower turnip, turnip, salsify and parsnip are also rich in vitamins and minerals.

A vitamin-rich diet, regular exercise, plenty of drinking, sufficient sleep and sauna visits ensure that you can enjoy the cold season with all its most beautiful sides and your skin survives the winter unscathed.

source: metabolic balance® Gesundheitsbrief February 2018

Metabolic Balance® Roasted Brussels Sprouts

Roasted Brussels Sprouts

Ingredients:

  • Brussel Sprouts
  • Olive Oil
  • Kosher salt
  • Ground black pepper

Instructions:

Cut off the brown end of the brussel sprouts and take off any discoloured leaves.  Place the brussel sprouts in a bowl and mix with some olive oil, salt and pepper.   Spread them on a baking sheet and roast for 40 minutes or until crisp on the outside and tender on the inside.

Sprinkle more salt on top as desired and serve with your meal.

photo of brussel sprouts by savvy christine