Grilled Steak with Cabbage Salad

This simple and easy recipe is perfect for anyone in Phase 2.

Ingredients: (1 serving)
1 serving of steak
1 serving of vegetables (pointed/white cabbage and bell peppers)
Apple cider vinegar
Fresh chives
Salt, pepper

Preparation:
Wash the pointed/white cabbage and slice into thin strips. Add 1 pinch of salt to the pointed cabbage and massage and then let it sit for 15 minutes. Wash the bell peppers and then halve, clean, and cut into strips. Season the steak with salt and pepper and then grill for 3-5 minutes on each side. Wrap the steak in aluminium foil and let it rest for about 10 minutes. Rinse the chives, pat dry, and cut into small sections. Mix bell peppers, chives, vinegar and cabbage, season to taste with salt and pepper. Serve the meat and cabbage salad. Pour the juices from the meat in the aluminium foil over the meat.
Enjoy!

Duck Breast with Chinese Cabbage

Duck is a very traditional German Christmas Dish – no wonder our Nutrition Experts and Chefs have a great recipe for it: this duck breast with orange Chinese cabbage has a fabulous taste of Christmas!

Ingredients:
1 serving duck breast
1 serving Chinese cabbage
1 orange
Spices: a dash of apple cider vinegar, salt and pepper, some black sesame seeds

Preparation:
Season the duck breast to taste with salt and pepper and stir fry in a hot pan for about 5 minutes. Place the pan with the duck breast in a preheated oven for about 18 minutes to finish cooking. Clean, wash and dry the Chinese cabbage, slice into very fine strips. Salt well in a bowl and knead for 3 minutes till soft. Peel the orange, cut into slices and chop coarsely. Add the oranges pieces to the Chinese cabbage and season with salt, pepper, vinegar and black sesame seeds. You can also roast the sesame seeds briefly in a pan. Enjoy!

MB 12-21 - Chinese Cabbage

Savoy Cabbage – what a magnificent vegetable!

We love savoy cabbage – how about you? We just think it has such magnificent green, wavy leaves! Until recently, when haute cuisine started to champion it and it’s popularity increased, it was very much overlooked. One of the wonderful things about savoy cabbage, is that it has an excellent long season. The early season savoy cabbage comes on the produce shelves around Easter Time and has rather tender, loose leaves. The autumn variety though, has thicker and firmer leaves and also has a slightly spicier flavor. 

Savoy cabbage tastes greats as a vegetable side dish. It’s great to be used for savoy cabbage rolls and in lasagne. In terms of its nutritional strengths, it really does enrich our health during the winter season. It is high in vitamin C, contains vitamin B6, vitamin E, folic acid, potassium, calcium and iron. With only 31 kilo-calories per 100g, savoy cabbage could be called a “slim” vegetable, that contains plenty of beneficial sulfur oils and chlorophyll. In southern Germany, its leaves are traditionally used as a “green hot-water bottle”. The ribs of dark green savoy cabbage leaves are cut flat and briefly placed in boiling water. They are then rolled flat and laid as compresses on the body to relieve pain such as abdominal pain, chest pain or leg cramps.

MB 11-30 - savoy cabbage

Pointed Cabbage

The tender cone of the Pointed cabbage: it’s small, fine and loosely wound – with these unique characteristics, the pointed cabbage has secured itself a special position in the cabbage family!  

As it’s naturally tender, it cooks quickly and does not need to be blanched even when using for stuffed cabbage. It also is a great addition when finely sliced into hearty and fruity-sweet salads. Make sure that it’s very fresh when you buy it, as the pointed cabbage doesn’t really have a long shelf life. Like the other members of the cabbage family, pointed cabbage is full of healthy nutrients, including vitamins C, B1, B2, potassium and beta-carotene. 

Our Top Tip: due to heat and cooking water, many nutrients can be lost. Therefore, simply finely cut some raw leaves and mix them under your other cooked vegetables.

MB 11-27 cabbage

How do you like pointed cabbage?  Share your favorite recipes and tips with us (add to comments)! 

What to know about Red Cabbage

MB 11-07 - Rotkohl

So what do you know about red cabbage? Let us fill you in on this excellent versatile vegetable! Firstly it’s available all year round now! However, it’s most popular in autumn and winter as a classic side dish to game, duck and roast goose or turkey.  It’s red coloring is not cultured, but a variation of nature. In traditional medicine it was believed that red cabbage had a positive effect on blood. Compresses made from red cabbage leaves are said to have alleviated varicose veins, phlebitis and leg ulcers. Red cabbage contains the pigment anthocyanin – also found in red berries and red wine – which has an antioxidant and anti-inflammatory effect. It has been shown in numerous studies that this flavonoid has cancer-inhibiting and cholesterol-lowering effects and is also linked to reduced risk of heart attacks and strokes. Red cabbage is rich in many vitamins and fiber and is an important immune booster during the cold season. It contains above all the vitamins C, B6 and E. 

Tip: to preserve the beautiful rich color of red cabbage, add some vinegar or citric acid when cooking.

Born to be an All-Round Star

MB 09-08-2019

Green cabbage is now available all year round. Particularly in the winter months it is a real blessing for your health with its valuable nutrients. And in summer it cuts a good figure. Whether spherical or longish – the robust vegetable that drives its stalk deep into the soil is particularly rich in folic acid and vitamin C. While many vegetables lose vitamin C during cooking, this doesn’t happen with green cabbage! This is because it also contains a lot of ascorbigen, a precursor of vitamin C. It is only converted to vitamin C during cooking. In addition, it supplies an excellent amount potassium for heart health, calcium for the bones and iron for the blood. And it’s doing all this while being low in calories and rich in fiber!