30 Reasons for Healthy Nutrition

Healthy Eaters Don’t Need Diets

Excess weight disappears permanently and on its own. The weight regulates itself as a desired side effect. Body forming also just happens. Diet frustration and the dreaded yo-yo effect are finally a thing of the past. The times where your thoughts go round in circles how to finally reduce weight come to a rest. Your focus will shift to essential questions and dreams in your life.

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Find your certified Metabolic Balance Coach to assist you on your journey right HERE

Preferences? Sure.

Isn’t it great that Metabolic Balance® nutrition plans are so highly individualized? Not only 36 blood values are analyzed, but even your preferences are taken into consideration. A match to your taste buds is at the same level as successful dating!

MB (2019-05-28)

Find your ideal coach as a partner on your health-journey HERE!

Lamb Chops, Carrot Stew and Baby Spinach

Today our young celebrity chef Jan-Philipp Cleusters recommends something very special: Lamb Chops, Carrot Stew and Baby Spinach

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Preparation time: 9 minutes
Ingredients for 2:
5 carrots
6 – 8 lamb chops
2 garlic cloves
2 sprigs rosemary
2 tbsp. olive oil
1 tbsp. balsamic vinegar
1 handful of cherry tomato
1⁄4 l vegetable stock
1 handful of baby spinach, ready to eat

Preparation:
Peel the carrots, remove the ends and cut them lengthwise into bite-sized stripes. Pat the lamb dry with paper towel and place in a medium-sized bowl.  Peel the garlic, cut into fine slices and add to the lamb. Heat a medium-sized pan at a high temperature without adding fat. Rinse the rosemary under cold running water, pat dry, pluck the needles from the branches, chop finely and add with the olive oil and balsamic vinegar to the lamb in the bowl. Season with sea salt and pepper. Rub the lamb with the marinade, place it in the preheated pan and sear it on both sides until it browns evenly.  Then reduce the heat to an intermediate level. Rinse the cherry tomatoes under cold running water, dry with paper towel, cut in halves and place tomato halves and carrots to the lamb into the pan. Stir well, deglaze with vegetable stock, season with sea salt and pepper to taste, let the liquid boil down a little. Add the baby spinach and leave it to briefly simmer at low heat. Remove the lamb from the pan and let it rest for a short time. Evenly drape the vegetables on plates and arrange the lamb on top of it. Enjoy!

Have you ever tried Dandelion Salad?

Dandelion leaves are rich in minerals, vitamins and enzymes it acts as a stimulant on many bodily functions. Try it in pointed cabbage salad:

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Ingredients:
150 g pointed cabbage
50 g dandelion
apple cider vinegar
1 TBsp. oil
salt, freshly ground pepper

Preparation:
Clean the pointed cabbage and cut very finely. Wash the dandelion and chop finely. Mix both with salt, blend and let rest for approximately ½ hour. Then work the greens thoroughly with apple cider vinegar; use salt and pepper to taste and add the oil. Let it rest in a cool place for one hour. Enjoy your meal!

Reasons for healthy nutrition: Fashion is fun again!

Body-hugging T-shirts, blouses, suits, shirts and dresses look wow again; you just feel good again if you don’t have to pull your stomach in all the time anymore . . . This also gives you a whole new sense of self-esteem when some people’s appraising looks or even unfriendly comments are a thing of the past. Those who are healthy, are attractive. This also increases your charisma to others.

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The Matter with the Healthy Fats

The matter with the oil – or rather healthy fats! How much oil can a Metabolic Balance participant actually consume?MB (2019-06-09)

If you want to lose weight with Metabolic Balance, you are recommended to forgo oil for the first 14 days.  Afterwards it is important to include high-quality oils in your daily regime again. It should be 3 tablespoons per day. Many clients also eat more and feel great about it.

We recommend to take at least 1 tbsp flax-seed oil per day.  Flax seed oil contains omega-3 fatty acids and is the star of recent research to prevent diabetes and Alzheimer’s disease. However, reliable studies are not available yet.

The ratio of flax seed oil to other oils should be 1:2, even better would be 1:1.
Oils may be mixed. Only for few oils heating is recommended.
You may also use oils from oil seeds and nuts that are NOT on your plan.
So do not hesitate to experiment, enjoy and have a good time!

 

The Gender of Fennel

Visiting my mom I went to the farmer’s market for her to buy some fresh produce, including Fennel, which she likes to eat raw. On my way out she calls after me and says: “Watch out and get a female fennel!” – – –fennel-1614693_1920 (Pixaby by Peter-facebook)

After a long thinking pause … “Say whaaat???”. Needless to say: “Mama knows best!”

Back on my LapTop I researched the topic and found a really interesting article by Marissa from Sicily, Italy.
Find the article about male and female fennel on her blog All Things Sicilian
[ Picture by Peter-facebook on Pixaby ].

Having said that – and the discussion is still out if it is the female or the male fennel that tastes better – look for the round fennel, with thicker stalks. That fennel has less “threads” (filaments) and is overall more tasteful and delicious. Marissa also implies, that at the end of the season you rather find the flatter fennel.

Food for Thought:

The Center of Science in the Public Interest (CSIP)hand-1549136_1920 just published a very interesting Info-Graphic on facebook, which linked to the following article. Giving food for thought: What to Eat – the Grandparents’ Diet!

Photo #hand#hold#care by 41330  (pixabay)

Let’s think about the world we bequeath to our children and grandchildren!

Staying Mentally Fit and Healthy into Old Age with the Right Nutrition

Recent research suggests that the classic Western diet with its many industrially-processed, fatty foods causes an increasing number of depressive and anxiety disorders. Unhealthy eating promotes inflammatory processes in the body and may contribute to a range of neurological and psychiatric disorders. A study conducted at the University of Pittsburgh with 247 participants showed that with a diet consisting mainly of tuna, salmon, olive oil, avocado and sweet potatoes, the participants showed far fewer depressive symptoms than the other group of test subjects, most of whom preferred industrially-processed foods.

More and more neuroscientists are recognizing the complex ways in which our food intake is related to brain health. A large number of studies have already been conducted and the list of foodstuffs that are supposed to be the right “food” for our brain is getting longer and longer – fish and the Omega 3 fatty acids, for example, are at the top of the list when it comes to preventing psychoses and depression. Lactic acid bacteria in fermented foods such as yogurt, pickles and sauerkraut appear to help alleviate anxiety and worry, while foods rich in antioxidants such as green tea and fruit can help keep dementia and Alzheimer’s at bay. One or two comparative studies are of course still required to clarify and supplement these findings. However, the most certain evidence to date is that the so-called Mediterranean diet of fruit, vegetables, fish, lean meat, olive oil and a glass of red wine every now and then is refreshment for the brain. In Western cuisine, on the other hand, frozen pizza, packaged soups and canned food are often on the table. According to a representative survey by the German Federal Ministry of Food and Agriculture, 20% of German households cook their own meals “actually never” or “at most once a week” – and 47% of German men and 22% of German women eat meat every day, which the experts also regard as being problematic.

In a study published in 2015, scientists even found evidence that poor nutrition “shrinks” the brain. The psychiatrist Felice Jacka, together with colleagues from Deakin University and the University of Melbourne in Australia, analyzed data from a longitudinal Australian study on mental health. At the start of the study, the subjects were between 60 and 64 years old, gave detailed information about their eating habits and underwent a brain scan. Their brains were scanned again four years later, and the focus was on the hippo-campus – which is considered the center of our memory. We also know that the hippo-campus shrinks with increasing age. The study results clearly showed that the left hippo-campus had become much smaller in the test persons who preferred hamburgers, steaks, french fries and soft drinks and declined fruit and vegetables, compared to those of test persons of the same age group who mostly preferred Mediterranean food.
The researchers are still not quite sure exactly which mechanisms are behind these findings. According to science, inflammatory processes could be one of the triggering factors. A high sugar content diet in particular promotes metabolic changes and inflammation in the body and several studies have shown that these inflammatory processes play an important role in brain diseases.

Epidemiologist Martha Morris and her team at Rush University in Chicago established similar relationships between nutrition (Mediterranean and low-salt) and cognitive decline in old age. In the observational study, 960 older people were asked about their eating habits and their mental fitness was regularly checked. Five years later, participants who said they often ate vegetables, berries, nuts and olive oil and little fried, fast food and red meat were less frequently diagnosed with Alzheimer’s disease. In the mental test, they also scored as well as subjects who were 7.5 years younger, but who had eaten unhealthy food.

Conclusion: A healthy diet combined with exercise and mental activity can help keep the “grey matter” fit longer in old age.

Silvia Bürkle
Metabolic Balance

Source:
1.    Jacka, F.N. et al.: Western Diet is Associated with a Smaller Hippocampus: A Longitudinal Investigation. In: BMC Medicine 13,215, 2015
2.    Morris, M.C. et al.: MIND Diet Associated with Reduced Incidence of Alzheimers’s disease. In: Alzheimers’s & Dementia 11, P. 1007-1014, 2015
3.    Sarris, J. et al: Nutritional Medicine as Mainstream in Psychiatry. In: Lancet Psychiatry 2, P. 271-274, 2015