Recipe Inspiration

At Metabolic Balance we like to integrate a serving of fruit into hearty dishes. One of our favorite ways to do this is by incorporating fruit into mixed salads. Today’s recipe inspiration is lettuce with boiled lentils, pickled beetroot and some pears. You can vary this salad with the ingredients that fit your plan. One variation would be to use mango instead of pear and avocado instead of beetroot. As we approach the summer months even consider adding seasonal fruits such as peaches or berries!

Eat the Rainbow

Food just like life is vibrant and colorful! From fresh bright green peas to earthy jicama, foods comes in all colors. For a healthy diet it is important to try to eat a variety of foods and challenging yourself to eat fruits, vegetables, and ingredients of different colors can do just that! This automatically ensures that you eat a valuable mix of fruits, vegetables, proteins and fats. Also try experimenting with new spices which can help round off a “healthy diet”. This way you supply our body with all the important vitamins, secondary plant substances, mineral nutrients, micro- and macronutrients it needs to thrive.

If you are looking to incorporate new foods check out this helpful guide from the American Heart Association: https://www.heart.org/idc/groups/heart-public/@wcm/@fc/documents/downloadable/ucm_466712.pdf

Kiwis

We love kiwis!
These wonderful fruits are also called Chinese gooseberries or monkey peaches and are originally from China. However, they are now cultivated worldwide and are available all year round. They contain twice as much vitamin C as oranges and lemons and therefore prevent the vitamin C deficiency disease scurvy. Just one kiwi is enough to cover the entire daily requirement of vitamin C. They also have a diuretic and laxative effect. The tropical fruit contains minerals such as calcium, potassium and iron as well as dietary fiber. In addition, kiwis are rich in carotenoids and magnesium. But most importantly, they taste simply delicious. You can eat them on their own, put them in your yogurt, or add them to a smoothie!

Yogurt with Pureed Fruit

Need a simple breakfast idea? Well look no further! Check out this easy and delicious recipe that can be ready in no time.

Take some yogurt (whichever form of dairy is on your plan) and add some pureed fruit. Fruits such as berries, mango, or bananas work very well! If would like a little texture, set aside a small portion of the fruit that will not be pureed and add to the yogurt as is. For added flavor you can also add vanilla, cinnamon or some lemon zest. From phase 3 on, a few chia seeds may also be added.

Variety of Food Matters

Did you know that older varieties of apples are better for you than new?  Old varieties contain more valuable dietary fibers such as cellulose or pectin and important vitamins and polyphenols. Varieties that are in the older category include Granny Smith, and Red and Golden Delicious.

More importantly this idea does not just apply to apples but also to other groups of foods such as corn. Check out this article from 2013 in the New York Times below to learn more.

https://www.nytimes.com/2013/05/26/opinion/sunday/breeding-the-nutrition-out-of-our-food.html

Happy National Banana Day!

In honor of this day let us talk about this amazing fruit!

This popular food is one of the most cultivated and consumed crops in the world. In addition to being an extremely versatile ingredient, the nutritional and health benefits are endless! Bananas are rich in potassium, vitamins C and B6, as well as flavonoids and phenolics. Eating bananas can help improve heart health, digestive health, lower your risk for Type 2 diabetes, and boost your mood.

Buy a large bunch next time you go to the grocery store and once ripe, cut them up and place them in the freezer. You can then pull them out as needed, for your morning oatmeal, a smoothie, or even some banana “nice” cream.

Source: https://www.perishablenews.com/…/national-banana-day-invit…/

Pomegranate – A “Silver Bullet”

For centuries, the pomegranate has been known in the Orient as the “apple of Aphrodite” and has been regarded as a symbol of eternal youth and fertility, even immortality. But the pomegranate is not an apple at all – in fact, it is a berry. The name, Pomegranate, derives from the color: garnet red.

MB 10-28 pomegrante

The pomegranate, which does not ripen after harvesting, contains many small, glassy translucent, juicy seeds in individual chambers – a total of about 400 per fruit!  These deep red to light pink colored seeds are particularly rich in bio-active ingredients such as flavonoids, polyphenols and phenolic acids as well as potassium, calcium, iron and vitamin C. 

More than 250 scientific studies so far have researched the positive effects of the “miracle fruit” pomegranate, especially with regard to cancer (blood, breast and prostate), cardiovascular diseases and arthritis. Pomegranates contain a particularly large number of highly effective polyphenols and can reduce the harmful effects of too much alcohol and nicotine, UV radiation and environmental toxins. In addition, the vital substances of the pomegranate promote the repair of already damaged cells. They support immune function and help against inflammatory processes; they have a cholesterol-lowering effect and thus prevent elevated blood fat levels. In addition, they slow the absorption of sugar in the intestine, and therefore support blood sugar balance and prevent diabetes. The bitter substances they contain are also beneficial for supporting digestion. Thus, the pomegranate is really nature’s “silver bullet”.

Image by Laura on Unsplash

Fresh vs. Dried Fruit

Many clients ask if dried fruit is okay to use instead of the fresh fruit listed on their plan.  The answer is simply No! Dried fruit contains significantly more concentrated sugar than fresh fruit. However, if you have dried fruit on your plan, you can exchange it for the fresh fruit equivalent in the ratio of 45g dried fruit to 120g fresh fruit.

MB 10-17 dried fruit 

An Organic Apple is a Class of it’s Own!

Did you know that an apple contains more than a million bacteria? Say … what?

MB 09-21-2019

This was recently discovered by scientists at the Graz University of Technology in Austria. The researchers found that eating apples is not only healthy for us because of the abundance of enzymes, vitamins, minerals, phytonutrients and other wonderful plant substances. We also get a great health boost to our gut flora from the different, beneficial bacteria found in an apple. Good bacteria is especially found in the core, the seeds and the pulp – less so on the peel, as one might think. In a recent study, it was also investigated whether there is a difference between apples from conventional cultivation and organic apples. The result was clear: The organic apples had much more diverse bacterial communities. In the case of organic apples, the pulp in particular showed the highest microbial diversity. The basic role of the pulp is to protect the seeds in the core and to enable their distribution for the successful propagation of the apple tree. A possible outcome of this study suggested it could be that the bacterial diversity in organic apples is similar to the effects of apple polyphenols on human health. Apple polyphenols are known not only to relieve allergic symptoms, but also to promote the growth of good bacteria such as lactobacillus and bifidobacterium in our digestive tract.

Mandelade – Almond Sunflower Seed Mix

Did you know that you can also bake with our popular Mandelade (almond-sunflower seed-mix)?

MB 08-24-2019

Try these wonderful almond muffins:

Ingredients:
You need (1 serving):

30 g almonds
10 g sunflower seeds
1 apple
cinnamon

Preparation:
Soak almonds and sunflower seeds overnight in water. Drain the almonds and sunflower seeds and puree with a little water. Add a grated apple and fill the mixture into a muffin form. Bake in preheated oven at approx. 200*C / 395*F for 15 minutes, allow to cool.  Garnish with a pinch of cinnamon. Enjoy!