Spinach

Spinach is a dark, leafy green vegetable that originated from central and western Asia. It contains high-quality protein, fiber, and 10 different vitamins and 13 different minerals. Its bitter substances support the entire digestion and also act as a tonic for the heart, liver and nerves. Its content of chlorophyll, folic acid, iron, copper and valuable enzymes strongly promotes the formation of both red and white blood cells, which has a strong influence on the immune system. The carotenoids in spinach protect the skin and mucous membranes and also strengthen the eyes.
Since spinach contains an above-average amount of oxalic acid, which blocks the absorption of calcium, one should preferably avoid eating milk or dairy products at the same meal, but choose a different source of protein.

The Intestine and its Inhabitants

The intestines are an important part of the digestive system – they transport the food bolus, absorb nutrients and water, produce vitamins and short-chain fatty acids, and remove indigestible food components. With a length of about 25ft and a surface area of up to 3,000 square feet. With our food, we not only absorb vital nutrients that enter the bloodstream via the intestine, but also encounter many foreign substances and pathogens. A healthy intestine that is equipped with a good intestinal flora and whose intestinal wall barrier is intact can catch, destroy and excrete toxins and pathogens before they can pose a risk to the body. Unfortunately, our gut microbes of the intestine can be massively disturbed by today’s modern nutrition and lifestyle. Often the intestinal mucosa is damaged, e. g. by a diet low in fiber and too much sugar or by abundant additives that are added in large quantities to many processed foods. It is estimated that about 17.6 lbs of preservatives pass through the intestine over the course of an adult life. This is unfavorable, since the preservatives do their job in the intestine just as they do as an additive in food: They destroy bacteria and do not distinguish between disease-causing or health-promoting intestinal bacteria.

The intestinal mucosa as a border post
Nutrients and water are supposed to reach the body from the intestine. However, this does not apply to undigested food components, toxins and pollutants. Therefore, the intestinal mucosa must form an effective barrier. Normally, the cells in the intestine are located close together and the intercellular spaces are sealed with a kind of “Velcro” tape, i. e. membrane protein complexes, the so-called „tight junctions“. In addition, the intestinal mucosa is supported by a variety of different intestinal bacteria, which settle on the intestinal mucosa like a “thick fluffy carpet”, creating an impermeable barrier to blood circulation. The tight junctions can be opened to allow larger molecules and larger quantities of water to pass through. Disruptive factors such as stress, medications, alcohol, pathogenic germs and various additives can alter the intestinal flora and damage the intestinal mucosa. The pathogenic bacteria primarily benefit from a changed intestinal flora, because they can adapt very quickly to the changed environment and multiply accordingly quickly. As a result, inflammation of the intestinal mucosa may occur and the intestinal epithelium gradually becomes permeable (leaky gut syndrome) to allergens, pollutants and pathogens that harm the body. Allergies, diabetes mellitus type 2, skin diseases and fungal infections are also associated with a damaged and altered intestinal flora.

Food for the intestinal cells
Lactobacilli (lactic acid bacteria) and bifidobacteria, which settle sufficiently in the intestine, can protect and strengthen the intestinal mucosa. Studies have impressively demonstrated that lactobacilli can repair defects caused by harmful bacteria. The broadest possible bacterial colonization in the intestine is therefore more than desirable. This ensures that the intestine is well supplied and the intestinal cells are optimally nourished. The intestinal cells receive all vital nutrients directly from the intestinal content. The intestinal content can be partially metabolized by some intestinal bacteria from the group of lactobacilli and bifidobacteria, forming short-chain fatty acids. Short-chain fatty acids provide energy, stimulate intestinal peristalsis and the circulation of the intestinal wall. Particular attention is paid to butyric acid, which promotes the metabolism of the intestinal mucosa and the growth of blood vessels in the intestinal wall. It also has anti-inflammatory and anticancerogenic effects. Propionic acid and acetic acid play an important role in gluco- and lipogenesis. Furthermore, propionic acid supports the glucose balance in addition to building up the intestinal flora. It throttles the release of glucose and stimulates the pancreas to produce insulin. At the same time, the sensitivity of the body cells to insulin is increased. It is therefore beneficial if sufficient lactobacilli and bifidobacteria colonize the intestine. With a nutrition rich in fiber, especially vegetables, legumes, whole grains and fruits, the bacterial population can be increased. But just as important are foods that provide probiotic bacterial strains, which are mainly found in fermented foods such as sauerkraut, yoghurt, kefir, buttermilk and many more.

Intestinal bacteria against obesity
Obesity is still mostly induced by high calorie food intake and lack of exercise. However, numerous studies have shown now that there is also a significant difference between normal and obese people with regard to the composition of the intestinal microbiome. Thus, the two bacterial phyla Bacteroidetes and Firmicutes occur in different populations – in normal-weight individuals, in the majority, Bacteroidetes were detected, while Firmicutes predominated in overweight individuals. The higher the percentage of Bacteroidetes, the lower the body weight was. Currently, scientists are increasingly interested in the significance of the bacterial species Prevotella and Bacteroides in connection with the clinical picture of obesity and the corresponding nutritional recommendations. In studies, subjects were divided into different enterotypes depending on which bacterial species dominated – Prevotella or Bacteroides. They were able to show that this classification had a decisive influence on dietary success. If Prevotella dominated, the subjects responded successfully to a nutrition characterized by abundant dietary fiber, especially fiber from whole grain products. If the bacterial strain Bacteroides had the upper hand, then this nutrition was less successful. Instead, a nutrition that promoted bifidobacteria, i.e. foods rich in inulin (parsnips, Jerusalem artichokes, leeks, salsify, and many others), was better able to positively influence metabolism and support weight loss.

Conclusion
Our intestine and its functionality has an immense influence on our health and well-being. For this reason, it is important to do everything possible to maintain intestinal health and take good care of the intestinal inhabitants. This is best achieved with a nutrition that is above all varied and rich in fiber and vital substances (vegetables, herbs, whole grains, legumes) and largely avoids processed foods and products. With a colorful mixture of these foods, as they are also compiled in the Metabolic Balance nutrition plan, the health-promoting intestinal bacteria receive plenty of nourishment and the opportunity to settle diligently in the intestine. In addition, high-quality fats (cold-pressed vegetable oils) and proteins (sea fish, nuts, dairy products, eggs) should not be missing. While fats support the energy production of intestinal cells, proteins (amino acids) are important components for building and repairing damaged intestinal cells. The Metabolic Balance nutrition plan takes all these criteria into account. Nevertheless, it may well be that participants with long-standing intestinal problems need support at the beginning of the nutritional change due to a very weakened intestinal flora. In this case, pre- and probiotics can be very useful and good. But – “Keep your eyes open when shopping” – many of these pre- and probiotics contain, in addition to a variety of bacterial strains, plenty of additives, which in turn cancel out the positive effect of the bacterial strains and have an unfavorable effect on the intestinal flora. For example, Metabolic Basics Probiotics B.26 is recommended. With 26 bacterial strains (100 billion germs) and 24 herbal, spice and fruit extracts, it offers a high concentration and bacterial diversity. At the same time, the herbal and spice extracts have an anti-inflammatory effect on the intestine and facilitate the settlement of important intestinal bacteria in the intestine.


Source:
Yu Q et al. Lactobacillus protects the integrity of intestinal epithelial barrier damaged by pathogenic bacteria. Front Cell Infect Mircobiol. 5:26.Doi: 103389/fcimb.2015.00026.Schumacher B. “Störungen im Darm machen krank“. Ärzte Zeitung 2014 Oct 10; 03:05.Wehkamp J, Götz M, Herrlinger K, Steurer W, Stange E „Chronisch entzündliche Darmerkrankungen“; Deutsches Ärzteblatt 2016 Feb 5; 113/5Fischer S. „Genom, Proteom und Mikrobiom – Ein mikrobiologischer Blick in den menschlichen Organismus. Die Naturheilkunde 5/2015Francesco Asnica et. Al: Microbiome connections with host metabolism and habitual diet from 1098 deeply phenotyped individuals; Nature Medicine (2021; DOI: 10.1038/s41591-020-01183-8)Christensen L., Roager H. m., astrup a., Hjorth m. f. (2018): microbial enterotypes in personalized nutri-tion and obesity management. am J Clin nutr 108 (4): 645–651Hjorth m. f., Roager H. m., Larsen T. m., Poulsen S. K.,Licht T. R. Bahl m. I., Zohar Y., astrup a. (2018): Pre-treatment microbial Prevotella-to-Bacteroides ratio, determines body fat loss success during a 6-month randomized controlled diet intervention. Int J Obes 42 (3): 580–583

Health and Nutrition

Healthy eating reduces the risk of chronic diseases and food intolerances. In addition, more than 70 percent of all diseases are diet-related. Above all, the risk of obesity, cardiovascular diseases and diabetes is drastically reduced if you eat healthier. It’s actually a very simple calculation, don’t you think? Metabolic Balance provides you the structure and support to get on track and live a healthy life.

Personalized To You

Metabolic Balance is for people to be unique. It’s for people to be their best selves. It’s for people like you to find out which food suits them and feel the best they can feel. Your food creates you so it’s no surprise that when it’s wrong, you don’t feel your best and your body and mind struggles to work. This is when symptoms happen, problems begin and poor health follows. At Metabolic Balance we believe with the right nutrients from your food, every person is able to have the potential to be as healthy as is possible for them. Your food is the best medicine you can take or the slowest form of poison. So which is it going to be for you? Let our analysis find your best foods for you and your body can do the rest. Find your Metabolic Balance practitioner today and live your best life!

Credit: Metabolic Balance Australia and New Zealand

Free Info Webinar

Have you found yourself wondering “why is my health like this”? “I just don’t feel like me anymore.” “Why can’t I get well?” “My body used to work but now I just don’t get what’s going on!” Food and lifestyle choices are now fully recognized as being intimately linked to everyday health. Join our free Info Webinar to learn how our Metabolic Balance Program resets your metabolism and manages your weight and well-being long-term without pills, shakes, injections or processed foods.

Join us on March 15, 2021 at 4:30 pm ET / 1:30 pm PT! Click the link below to register.
https://www.metabolic-balance.us/Information-Event

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Mix It

While you are eating according to your Metabolic Balance nutrition plan, you should not mix protein sources and fruit. In the case of vegetables, however, the motto is: Mix it! MIX your permitted vegetables and use them as varied as possible. Not only do the portion sizes vary constantly, you also supply your metabolism with a variety of different nutrients.

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Tryptophan

L-tryptophan is one of the essential amino acids and is used by the body to produce serotonin. This hormone is vital in helping control your mood and sleep! Tryptophan is an amino acid that can’t by produced by the body so it has to come into our bodies through our diets. A deficiency in tryptophan can lead to increased stress, anxiety, and feelings of depression. Incorporating foods rich in tryptophan can help prevent such a deficiency. The foods below are all rich in tryptophan and worth incorporating into your diet! So check your Metabolic Balance meal plan right now and incorporate the foods that are good for you into your meals. 

★ Salmon
★ Oats
★ Almonds
★ Pumpkin and sunflower seeds
★ Avocados

Tomato, Egg, and Avocado Carpaccio

This easy and fast carpaccio recipe is simple, delicious, and great as a lunch or dinner recipe.

Ingredients:
¼ tsp black sesame seeds
1 tomato 
1 serving of avocado
1 serving of hard boiled eggs
1 serving of lettuce 
Fresh herbs
Apple cider vinegar
Oil 
Salt and pepper

Preparation:
Toast the sesame in a dry pan and set aside. Wash the tomato and peel the eggs. Wash the lettuce and cut into bite-sized pieces. Mix dressing of 1 tablespoon of oil and 1 tablespoon of apple cider vinegar with 1 tablespoon of fresh herbs, salt and pepper. Halve the avocado, remove the pit and and peel. Cut the eggs, tomato and avocado into slices and place them in a circle, alternating between slices. Season with salt and sesame seeds. Arrange the lettuce in the middle of it, serve immediately with dressing. Enjoy!

Liver Health

A few weeks ago we wrote about the ways our body detoxifies and one of the major organs involved is the liver. The liver is the largest solid organ in the body and filters the blood from the digestive tract. It plays a vital role in detoxifying chemicals and metabolizing drugs. Keeping your liver healthy and functioning well is important for your overall health. To learn more about tips and ways to improve your liver health check out this infographic below.

Credit: Johns Hopkins University

Savoy Cabbage

Savoy cabbage or also known as curly cabbage is one of the prettiest and unique varieties of cabbage. It has green, slightly curly leaves and is less tightly packed than some of its relatives in the cabbage family. For a long time it wasn’t a very popular ingredient but has recently risen in prominence. As a vegetable it is extremely versatile and can be used in many dishes from soups and salads to wraps and lasagna. Savoy cabbage is also very healthy, packed full of vitamins C, B6, E, folic acid, as well as potassium, calcium, and iron. During your next trip to the grocery store pick up a savoy cabbage and try it out in some new dishes!