Be Mindful and Meditate

Meditation is a seen in prehistoric wall arts originated in India and Buddhism. Today, we have neurosciences research on the topic and state “… that 50-year-olds can have the brain of 25-year-olds if they sit quietly and do nothing for 15 minutes a day.” This is reported by Business Insider. Give it a try if just to improve focus and lessen stress!

stream-1106336_1920 (Image by John Hain from Pixabay)

Image by John Hain from Pixabay

More than an Apple a Day …

… preventing the most common disease! Dr. Greger has scoured the world’s scholarly literature on clinical nutrition, and developed this brand-new live presentation on the latest in cutting-edge research on how a healthy diet can affect some of our most common medical conditions.
Watch Dr. Greger’s very interesting movie about diseases and nutrition right HERE.

apple-3768451_1920 (Image by Kay Lenze from Pixabay)

Image by Kay Lenze from Pixabay

 

How can Yoga benefit Weight Loss?

sun-2571158_1920 (Image by MBatty from Pixabay)

June 21 was International Day of Yoga – and it made us think! How can Yoga benefit Weight Loss or Weight Maintenance. Well, with the latter everyone can agree easily. But Yoga also supports your weight loss goal, simply by the deep breathing and Yoga exercises that use your own body weight. Interested? – Read further in the following article:
https://www.gaiam.com/blogs/discover/how-to-lose-weight-with-yoga
Image by MBatty from Pixabay

 

30 Reasons for Healthy Nutrition

Healthy Eaters Don’t Need Diets

Excess weight disappears permanently and on its own. The weight regulates itself as a desired side effect. Body forming also just happens. Diet frustration and the dreaded yo-yo effect are finally a thing of the past. The times where your thoughts go round in circles how to finally reduce weight come to a rest. Your focus will shift to essential questions and dreams in your life.

MB

Find your certified Metabolic Balance Coach to assist you on your journey right HERE

Food for Thought:

The Center of Science in the Public Interest (CSIP)hand-1549136_1920 just published a very interesting Info-Graphic on facebook, which linked to the following article. Giving food for thought: What to Eat – the Grandparents’ Diet!

Photo #hand#hold#care by 41330  (pixabay)

Let’s think about the world we bequeath to our children and grandchildren!

Staying Mentally Fit and Healthy into Old Age with the Right Nutrition

Recent research suggests that the classic Western diet with its many industrially-processed, fatty foods causes an increasing number of depressive and anxiety disorders. Unhealthy eating promotes inflammatory processes in the body and may contribute to a range of neurological and psychiatric disorders. A study conducted at the University of Pittsburgh with 247 participants showed that with a diet consisting mainly of tuna, salmon, olive oil, avocado and sweet potatoes, the participants showed far fewer depressive symptoms than the other group of test subjects, most of whom preferred industrially-processed foods.

More and more neuroscientists are recognizing the complex ways in which our food intake is related to brain health. A large number of studies have already been conducted and the list of foodstuffs that are supposed to be the right “food” for our brain is getting longer and longer – fish and the Omega 3 fatty acids, for example, are at the top of the list when it comes to preventing psychoses and depression. Lactic acid bacteria in fermented foods such as yogurt, pickles and sauerkraut appear to help alleviate anxiety and worry, while foods rich in antioxidants such as green tea and fruit can help keep dementia and Alzheimer’s at bay. One or two comparative studies are of course still required to clarify and supplement these findings. However, the most certain evidence to date is that the so-called Mediterranean diet of fruit, vegetables, fish, lean meat, olive oil and a glass of red wine every now and then is refreshment for the brain. In Western cuisine, on the other hand, frozen pizza, packaged soups and canned food are often on the table. According to a representative survey by the German Federal Ministry of Food and Agriculture, 20% of German households cook their own meals “actually never” or “at most once a week” – and 47% of German men and 22% of German women eat meat every day, which the experts also regard as being problematic.

In a study published in 2015, scientists even found evidence that poor nutrition “shrinks” the brain. The psychiatrist Felice Jacka, together with colleagues from Deakin University and the University of Melbourne in Australia, analyzed data from a longitudinal Australian study on mental health. At the start of the study, the subjects were between 60 and 64 years old, gave detailed information about their eating habits and underwent a brain scan. Their brains were scanned again four years later, and the focus was on the hippo-campus – which is considered the center of our memory. We also know that the hippo-campus shrinks with increasing age. The study results clearly showed that the left hippo-campus had become much smaller in the test persons who preferred hamburgers, steaks, french fries and soft drinks and declined fruit and vegetables, compared to those of test persons of the same age group who mostly preferred Mediterranean food.
The researchers are still not quite sure exactly which mechanisms are behind these findings. According to science, inflammatory processes could be one of the triggering factors. A high sugar content diet in particular promotes metabolic changes and inflammation in the body and several studies have shown that these inflammatory processes play an important role in brain diseases.

Epidemiologist Martha Morris and her team at Rush University in Chicago established similar relationships between nutrition (Mediterranean and low-salt) and cognitive decline in old age. In the observational study, 960 older people were asked about their eating habits and their mental fitness was regularly checked. Five years later, participants who said they often ate vegetables, berries, nuts and olive oil and little fried, fast food and red meat were less frequently diagnosed with Alzheimer’s disease. In the mental test, they also scored as well as subjects who were 7.5 years younger, but who had eaten unhealthy food.

Conclusion: A healthy diet combined with exercise and mental activity can help keep the “grey matter” fit longer in old age.

Silvia Bürkle
Metabolic Balance

Source:
1.    Jacka, F.N. et al.: Western Diet is Associated with a Smaller Hippocampus: A Longitudinal Investigation. In: BMC Medicine 13,215, 2015
2.    Morris, M.C. et al.: MIND Diet Associated with Reduced Incidence of Alzheimers’s disease. In: Alzheimers’s & Dementia 11, P. 1007-1014, 2015
3.    Sarris, J. et al: Nutritional Medicine as Mainstream in Psychiatry. In: Lancet Psychiatry 2, P. 271-274, 2015

Metabolic Balancers Know that Aging Well Starts Now.

Don’t wait.  If you want to live a healthy life when you are retired, then you better start paying attention to your health now.

Never Too Late to Start –  No matter how old you are, it is never too late to start.  Barbara La Valleur , a metabolic balancer in Minneapolis, is retired and decided to focus on eating well. She has lost 45 pounds and is feeling awesome following the metabolic balance plan.

Stay Active –  Incorporate at least two to three hours of exercise a week.  Exercise does not mean heading to the gym. Taking a walk around the neighborhood or taking the stairs at work will count towards a good weekly workout.

Take Up Yoga – If you don’t use it, you lose it in regards to flexibility.  Join a stretching group or yoga class to keep your muscles limber.

Set Realistic Goals – Talk to your metabolic balance coach about setting realistic goals. If you have a clear sense of purpose and drive then you will find it easier to reach your goals.

Budget Your Money – Getting your finances in order will reduce the stress in your life which will help you to age more gracefully.

Visit the Doctor –   Get a physical to make sure that everything is going as it should.  By getting a routine checkup, you can make sure that everything is running smoothly.

Practice Being an Optimist – Studies have shown that people who are optimists are less likely to dye from heart failure than pessimists.  (This feels like a self fulfilling prophesy.)  If you can make lemonade from lemons, you will live a happier life.

Eat the Right Foods – Following the metabolic balance plan will ensure that you are eating the right foods but, as you venture into phase four, you will want to have regular chats with your coach about the foods you are adding back into your kitchen.

Pick up a Hobby – Engage in a non -sedentary activity such as gardening or walking your dog for two to three hours a week.

Get Some Friends – Being around friends is relaxing and will help you age more gracefully. Schedule regular meetups with people you enjoy spending time with so that you can live a longer and happier life.

If you would like to try an interesting Smoothie, check out our Monday Recipe.

 

 

 

 

Time to Switch off the TV and Hit the Books

School is in session for millions of students around the world and we encourage you to hit the books even if you left the classroom years ago. Eating the right foods helps your mind but you must also work the brain to keep it healthy.

  • According to this article, “It seems it is not enough just to get out and do something—it is important to get out and do something that is unfamiliar and mentally challenging, and that provides broad stimulation mentally and socially…”
  • Cognitive exercised can produce lasting results.  According to this article, people who were provided were training were still seeing positive results five years later.
  • Learn German to improve your aging brain and read all the metabolic balance cookbooks. If German isn’t the challenge you want to tackle, try another foreign language. According to the BBC, learning a second language has positive effects on the brain with the strongest effects seen in general intelligence and reading.
  • Lastly, below is a video discussing language and other cognitive processes. (Geeky video worth watching)

If you want to take a challenging and free course online, you can try to learn coding at the code academy.  Coding is a language which will be challenging to learn and will offer you a valuable skill for the current workforce environment.  If you want to learn a spoken language, you can try Thai or maybe Cantonese. (Links to more language can be found here.)

Exercise_your_brain-infographic_645

Below is an academic lecture about language and cognitive processes (Very geeky and long but worth listening to if you want to know more about this topic.)