All About Eggs

Eggs are often referred to as “nature’s multivitamin.” So you may be wondering, what is in an egg?

Well the answer is a lot!
On average, chicken eggs have about nine grams of protein, eight grams of fat, essential omega-3 fatty acids, and almost all minerals and vitamins (except for vitamin C). They are also one of the few foods that contains all 9 essential amino acids. No wonder then that in many health-conscious kitchens, eggs are a staple. We asked Silvia Bürkle, the head nutritionist at Metabolic Balance her thoughts and she said, “The dietary protein in eggs is of especially high quality because we know that egg protein can be converted into the protein we need in our bodies exceptionally well. That protein is important for muscle growth, cell renewal and the production of enzymes and hormones.”
There endless ways in which you can incorporate eggs into your diet, whether scrambled, sunny side up, poached, or boiled!

Beans

Some clients whether beans belong in the vegetable or protein category. In the case of beans, Metabolic Balance actually distinguishes between different beans, some which belong to the vegetable group and those which belong to the protein group:

Beans, which are considered a source of protein, are legumes (white beans, pinto beans, cannellini beans red kidney beans, lima beans, adzuki beans, black-eyed beans, etc. ). Beans that are classified as vegetables are green beans (string/green beans, French beans or Chinese long beans). There are also new varieties, such as yellow beans, which may also be used. The amount in the nutrition plan always refers to dry AKA uncooked weight. If using already cooked or pre-soaked protein beans, the indicated amount should be simply doubled.

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Tofu

Tofu is great plant-based protein source that is made from soybeans. Although it it has exploded in popularity the last few years, it has been a staple in Chinese cuisine for over 2000 years. As a food, tofu is a great source of protein as well as iron, calcium and magnesium. Additionally, tofu can help reduce the levels of LDL or “bad” cholesterol and help reduce bone loss. In the kitchen, tofu is extremely versatile and can be used in both sweet and savory dishes. It is perfect for stir fries, baked, in curries, as well as in sweet dishes including mousses and pies. If you are looking to incorporate more meat-free protein sources into your diet tofu is a great option.

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Oats

Oats are one of the healthiest whole grains on the planet and are mainly grown in North America and Europe. They are a great source of nutrients, packed full fiber, protein, manganese, phosphorous, iron, and magnesium. Oats also contain large amounts of beta-glucan, a type of soluble fiber which has been shown to decrease cholesterol levels and help promote growth of beneficial bacteria in the gut. In addition to being great for your health, oats are very versatile. They are a great base for sweet or savory oatmeal and are a great binder for meatballs, soups, and energy bites.

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Walnuts

Did you know that walnuts are a real super food?  They contain the essential fatty acid linolenic acid (an omega-3 fat) which is one of the two essential fatty acids that humans need to obtain from their diet. Essential fatty acids are known to offer a whole range of anti-aging and anti-inflammatory benefits. They keep the heart healthy by helping the blood vessels be flexible, prevent arteriosclerosis and have a positive influence on cholesterol levels.  

Walnuts are very high in protein and therefore particularly great for vegetarians. A handful of walnuts (about 43g) provides 8g of protein. They are also among the richest sources of antioxidants that help protect against cancer. They are rich in vitamins A, B1, B2, B3, C and E, pantothenic acid and important minerals such as zinc, potassium, magnesium, phosphorus, sulfur, iron and calcium. Walnuts also boost digestion, as they are very rich in fiber.

Persimmon

Persimmons are delicious fruits that come into season in the winter. Native to China, Japan, and Korea, persimmons are also extremely nutritious. They are rich in dietary fiber and important vitamins and minerals including, manganese, vitamin C, and beta carotene. In the kitchen, persimmons are extremely versatile and can be used in sweet and savory dishes. They are delicious in salads, breads, cookies, jams, and pies. So next time you are at the grocery store, give this wonderful fruit a try.

Dates

Dates are the sweet fruit of date trees that are native to the Middle East, Northern Africa, and South Asia. This fruit has grown in popularity around the world and is used in a variety of cuisines. In addition to being delicious, dates have many health benefits and are packed with vitamins and minerals. Dates are high in fiber, polyphenols (antioxidants), iron, potassium, and magnesium. This fruit can support a healthy digestion, reduce the risk of heart disease, and support bone health. Not only are dates good for your health but they are also extremely versatile and perfect in many dishes. They are great in smoothies, on salads, as a quick snack, or in savory Moroccan stews.

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Optimize Your Health

Is it actually possible to eat healthy…? Buying healthy food, well that can be easy. But to know which individual foods are good for your health, that’s another story. The solution for a holistic way of eating is: Metabolic Balance. Our nutrition plan, based on your personal blood analysis includes exactly the foods you need for optimal health. To learn more visit our website to connect with one of our coaches!

Radishes

Do you like small radishes? We love them! They are a little milder in flavor than their bigger counterparts such as daikon. Nevertheless, they taste delicious especially with a bit of salt and are delightfully crunchy.

Their fresh juice is considered a genuine medicine in naturopathy: Its essential oils clean and regenerate the mucous membranes, stimulate digestion and lower high cholesterol. Water accumulation in the body is also accelerated and washed out again. Small radishes contain valuable carotene, some B vitamins, plenty of potassium, sodium, magnesium, calcium, phosphorus, iron and enzymes. If you don’t like them raw, you can try to roast or saute them with some garlic, salt and pepper. This gives them a milder but delicious flavor.

Spinach

Spinach is a dark, leafy green vegetable that originated from central and western Asia. It contains high-quality protein, fiber, and 10 different vitamins and 13 different minerals. Its bitter substances support the entire digestion and also act as a tonic for the heart, liver and nerves. Its content of chlorophyll, folic acid, iron, copper and valuable enzymes strongly promotes the formation of both red and white blood cells, which has a strong influence on the immune system. The carotenoids in spinach protect the skin and mucous membranes and also strengthen the eyes.
Since spinach contains an above-average amount of oxalic acid, which blocks the absorption of calcium, one should preferably avoid eating milk or dairy products at the same meal, but choose a different source of protein.