Heartburn and Drugs for Acid-Related Disorders

Many of us are more or less familiar with heartburn. Spicy-hot food, sweets, alcohol, coffee, eating at a late hour or being overweight are just some of the reasons we may get heartburn. And to get rid of these unpleasant symptoms, more often than not we reach for acid reducers or antacids. In Germany, one in every eight individuals take antacids, of which Omeprazole, Pantoprazole or Lansoprazole are some examples. In the U.S. Milk of Magnesia, Maalox, Pepto-Bismol, Tums and many more are known OTC acid reducing drugs. They’re fast-acting and allow us to enjoy everything we eat and drink without suffering the consequences. Yet those OTC-meds are not as harmless as they are frequently portrayed – especially if taken over a long period.tums-1528834_1920

Antacids, otherwise known as proton pump inhibitors, or PPIs, block an enzyme referred to as a “proton pump”, which is found in the parietal cells of the stomach lining. Stomach acid is produced in the parietal cells and then transported into the stomach with the aid of the proton pump. If the proton pump is blocked, very little or no acid is transported into the stomach. It is this mechanism that relieves heartburn sufferers.

Unfortunately, it also has hidden risks, especially if acid blockers are taken frequently and regularly. Because stomach acid also acts as a disinfectant, killing bacteria that you eat with your food. If little or no stomach acid is produced, the bacteria are able to migrate into the intestines unobstructed and modify the composition of the gut bacteria – for the worse.
Another point is that protein is also digested in the stomach. Low stomach acid levels raise the pH of the stomach, with the result that proteins are only partially broken down. Large protein molecules then enter the gut, some of which are unable to enter the bloodstream and start to rot. Some of the large protein particles are absorbed through the gut lining, but are considered as foreign bodies, which can result in allergies.
The modified pH of the stomach also makes it more difficult to absorb minerals such as calcium, magnesium, iron and zinc, and in the long run contributes to a large deficit of vital nutrients which may result in symptoms such as exhaustion, fatigue, cramps, dizziness, and much more.
The parietal cells are not only responsible for producing stomach acid; they are also required for the production of what is known as the “intrinsic factor”. The intrinsic factor facilitates the absorption of vitamin B12. When absent, vitamin B12 deficiency is the inevitable result.

Heartburn can often be managed with a few simple changes to your eating habits and lifestyle – without any kind of medication. Experts recommend losing weight if you are overweight, restrict alcohol and coffee consumption, and eating less fried and spicy food. Instead, try including more steamed vegetables, potatoes and millet in your diet. Also, prefer non-carbonated water, herbal tea or diluted vegetable juices to quench your thirst.

Quick fixes for heartburn
– Medicinal clay or zeolite
– Soaked ground flaxseed or psyllium husks
– Potato juice
– Chew a few almonds or hazelnuts, mixing them well in your mouth with saliva, then swallow this pulp in small portions.

Silvia Bürkle
Medical Advisory Body, Metabolic Balance.

Our Health and Immune System in Winter Times

IMG_6114The human immune system is a central component of the body’s defenses, protecting the body from invading bacteria and viruses. But not only the immune system must be supported, also the skin has an increased need for care. Cold and dry heating air remove moisture from the skin. It narrows the skin vessels, the production of sebum is reduced and the formation of the central skin barrier is shut down. As a result of this combination, the skin becomes uncomfortably dry, brittle and cracked. In order that the skin does not suffer and it radiates vitality even in the cold season, a combination of external and internal care is a “must”. Dry skin can be prevented with the help of Omega 3 fatty acids, which are abundant in sea fish and cold pressed vegetable oils such as flax seed oil and rapeseed oil (oil colza). It is also important that the fluid reservoirs are filled up and we are hydrated. Even if in winter the feeling of thirst is something sparse, we must drink enough. It is recommended to drink plenty of herbal teas, ginger water and mineral water.

In addition to the above mentioned cold-season-care, we should also ensure that the body is sufficiently supplied with vitamins. The vitamins A, C and E fight together against the cell-damaging free radicals, strengthen and support the connective tissue, prevent the skin from becoming chapped and dry. Vitamin B5 (panthothenic acid) is the vitamin that can bind moisture and give the skin a radiant complexion. Vitamin B3 enhances skin protection and relieves redness.

An ideal vitamin supplier for the cold season is cabbage, which is available harvest-fresh even in cold regions in the winter. Looking at the typical vitamin-rich winter vegetables such as Brussels sprouts and kale the first frost on the fields even enhances its taste. But beetroot, Teltower turnip, turnip, salsify and parsnip are also rich in vitamins and minerals.

A vitamin-rich diet, regular exercise, plenty of drinking, sufficient sleep and sauna visits ensure that you can enjoy the cold season with all its most beautiful sides and your skin survives the winter unscathed.

source: metabolic balance® Gesundheitsbrief February 2018

An Apple a Day …

WinterApple

“An Apple A Day” is a fundamental rule in our metabolic balance® Program – for many good reasons! Reader’s Digest Magazine listed 8 of them:

1. Apples fight Alzheimer’s
2. Apples prevent colon cancer
3. Apples stabilize blood sugar
4. Apples boost gum health
5. Apples prevent high blood pressure
6. Apples help you lose weight
7. Apples fend off heart disease
8. Apples fight high cholesterol

The proverbial advice “An Apple a Day keeps the Doctor away” first appeared in print in 1866 reports Medical News Today. Foods like apples certainly fall into the category of Food is Nature’s Medicine – especially from a preventative point of view! Take a look at Mother Nature’s Pop Science Guide to Apples. To quote from the subtitle of the post on Mother Nature’s Network web page, “the apple is one of Earth’s most iconic foods, symbolizing everything from health and beauty to evil and ingenuity. In honor of these gravity-revealing, doctor-repelling superfruits, MNN offers a graphical tribute to apples’ enduring popularity.”

Rebalancing to be Your Ideal Weight

Don’t wait until the new year. If you have been on the metabolic balance plan for a year and have more weight to lose or have stopped following the plan and want to start your journey again, now is the time to start rebalancing.  

Rebalancing

What does it mean to rebalance?  Rebalancing means going back to phase 1 & 2 of the plan so that you can reset your body and get back on track.  (If you have been off the program for awhile, we suggest you get a new plan from your metabolic balance coach.)

Many clients have a hard time realizing they have gained weight or, that they have strayed too far from their metabolic balance plan.  If you are a metabolic balancer and,

-Your clothes or rings getting tighter;

-You have less energy;

-There a reduction in your well-being;

-You reached your alarm weight*;

A rebalancing should be done with the assistance of your coach.  Because the focus of the metabolic balance plan is to help you have a healthy lifestyle, a rebalancing should be done no more than once a year.   If you find that you need to do a rebalancing several times in a short period of time, you may have diet issues that need to be addressed by your coach. 

If you would like to read more about the metabolic balance plan, please check out our posts for phase ½, phase 3, and phase 4.

*Alarm weight.  Sylvia Egel uses an alarm weight with her clients as a warning that something is wrong.  If a client reaches their alarm weight, they need to do a rebalancing to get things back on track.

Before rebalancing:

  • Let your coach know that you are rebalancing and discuss with your coach the challenges you faced or are facing with eating the metabolic balance way.
  • If it has been several years since you received your initial plan, ask your coach for an updated plan based on a new blood test to gauge your current health and nutritional status. (There is a charge for a new plan based on a new blood test.)
  • Prepare your kitchen/home for phase 1 and 2.  Eliminate any foods from your house which will derail you during those first few weeks.
  • Lighten your schedule and try to keep the stress down while you are making this healthy change to your body and your lifestyle.

Additional Posts on Rebalancing:

4 tips for rebalancing

Rebalancing tips from metabolic balance Germany

 

Flu Season – Stay Healthy With Healthy Habits

No one wants to get sick.  Luckily,  there are a variety of healthy habits that you can easily add to your daily routine to make sure you reduce your risk of catching a cold or the flu.

Avoid close contact with people who are sick.  If you are the one who is sick, stay away from healthy people which means, you should stay home if you are sick. I know this may be difficult if you have a work deadline but your body needs to rest to recover and the public doesn’t need to be exposed to your illness.  This means, you should not run errands just because you are not at work.  A sick day really means hanging out at home and letting your body recover.

Cover your mouth and nose when you are coughing and sneezing.  After you’ve sneezed wash your hands or use an alcohol based hand rub to ensure you are not transferring germs to door handles, telephones, and other areas where many people put their hands.

Don’t touch your face unless you’ve washed your hands.  When you touch your environment and then your face, you are transferring germs onto your skin, mouth or eyes. Clean often touched surfaces including doorknobs pens, and keyboards.

Washing your hands frequently.  Your hands especially under the fingernails carry an abundant number of germs.  Take the time to wash your hands with warm soapy water – sing happy birthday to yourself for 20 seconds and then dry your hands with paper towels using the towel to turn off the water.

Exercise to build up your immunity. Schedule twenty to 30 minutes of cardio everyday.  Research has shown that women who workout had one third of the colds of women who did not exercise.

Get enough sleep. Your body needs time to recover.  Research has shown that short sleepers are more likely to get sick.

Follow your Metabolic Balance® plan. – Metabolic Balance® has reviewed what your body needs to be balanced so following your plan will help ensure that your body is healthy and able to support your immune system which makes it easier to fight off a cold or the flu.

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photo of sleeping woman by Pedro Ribeiro Simoes