We all know that coffee is allowed with Metabolic Balance but it’s only allowed during the meal and without milk – thus, black! Now, did you know that if you have milk on your food list, you could enjoy milk with your coffee? But only with the meal you use milk as your protein. To do so is perfectly fine – and according to our strategies of success – if you use a portion of your allotted amount of milk. This way you could enjoy a cappuccino, a latte or café au lait with breakfast! Remember, since you can’t mix proteins, milk in coffee is only allowed if milk is your protein for that meal.

MB 02-20 - Kaffee

National Almond Day

Our Mandelade breakfast recipes are perfect on today`s “Almond Day” and we’d love to share two versions with you – an energy packed power breakfast and an enhanced beauty option.

For the energy packed “power” breakfast you need:
30g almonds (for female | 40g almonds as a male)
20g raw sunflower seeds (for female | 30g raw sunflower seeds for male)
½ Apple
1 pinch of cinnamon

The beauty enhancing breakfast where sensual almonds meet sunflower seeds, mango and vanilla for a wonderful start to the day. 

You need:
30g almonds (for female | 40g almonds as a male)
20g raw sunflower seeds (for female | 30g raw sunflower seeds for male)
¼ Mango
some vanilla pulpMB 02-16 - Mandeln

For both options, simply soak the almonds and sunflower seeds overnight in water and puree all ingredients in the morning. Enjoy!Mandelade

 

 

 

Also see our Video for the first recipe!

 

 

 

 

How to Use Lavender

Are you ready for something a bit different? We love the use of lavender in the kitchen!

The famed French aromatic spice ‘Herbs de Provence’ has at its heart lavender and without lavender it simply wouldn’t be the same. Combined with the other herbs growing wild in Provence, such as thyme, rosemary, oregano, marjoram and savory, lavender gives a very special addition to so many vegetable and meat dishes. We love lavender added to sheep’s cheese when marinated in oil. MB 02-03 - Lavendel

Even award-winning cuisine has discovered the use of lavender in lamb dishes or desserts getting a slightly tart flavor from the delicate flowers. 

We suggest you try a lavender vinegar for crisp summer salads. Simply add a handful of lavender flowers to 750 ml white wine vinegar and leave in a cool, dark place for about two weeks. You can then strain the vinegar and pour into smaller, dark colored bottles.

Delicious!

Tofu – the Protein Source for Vegetarians and Vegans

Tofu is not only an excellent versatile food it’s a very interesting one too. The soft, milk-colored tofu is also known as Asia’s cheese. It’s produced by processing cooked soybeans. The milk-like liquid obtained is thickened by a mineral coagulant (calcium sulfate) to create Tofu. Nutritionally, tofu contains great levels of protein, only few saturated fatty acids and no cholesterol. It’s naturally gluten-free and therefore suitable for individuals with celiacs disease. It’s often a natural choice for vegans however it’s important to point out that tofu doesn’t contain any vitamin B12 which is vital to include as an additional supplement when following a strict vegan diet.

Tofu is a real “quick change artist” in the kitchen – meaning, it can be prepared in many different ways and is one of the most multi-purpose proteins available. In its natural state, Tofu has very little taste of its own and so easily takes on the flavors and aromas of other ingredients with which it’s prepared. It can be used with stir-fries, soups, vegetable dishes and even as a dessert.

MB 02-01 - Tofu

How to Use Lentil- or Bean-Pasta?

We are often asked why we recommend lentil or bean pasta only in Phase 3, even if legumes are on the plan for Phase 2. 

We want to explain the reason: in order to make pasta from any legume, lentils or beans, the legumes have to be highly processed (soaked, boiled, dried and processed into flour). The lentil or bean pasta is cooked again when we prepare our meals. Because of this long and relatively complex process, a large part of the vitamins and minerals contained in the “alternative” pasta is naturally going to be lost. This is not ideal for Phase 2 (Strict Conversion). For the metabolic change and reaching health goals it is important – especially in the beginning – to eat and combine foods with optimal nutrients. Starting Phase 3 though, when the metabolism is stable and nicely balanced, we can have more leeway. With the Relaxed Conversion (Phase 3) lentil or bean pasta may be enjoyed.

MB 01-xx - Linsen gelb vs. pasta

How about Lemon?

Here’s another very common question we are asked – can I use a lemon to season my meals? 

The answer is yes and no. If lemon is on your list then you can definitely use the whole lemon. Lemon will be listed as one of your fruits, thus, if it is listed, then yes it can be used with your meal. You can use it in both, water or tea and as an ingredient in your food.  

The lemon peel, on the other hand, can be used as a seasoning by everyone. This is regardless of the phase they are in.

MB 01-12 - Zitrone

What about Frozen Food?

One of the more common questions we get is about frozen foods. Can I use frozen meat, fish, vegetable or fruit? And how much should I have when it’s frozen? 

First, yes you can use frozen foods, as long as they contain no additives, fats or sauces – simply the pure food. We’ve seen, for example, commercial frozen fruit with added sugar. This would definitely not be allowed. So if you’re buying frozen foods, always check the label. If it’s a whole food that has been frozen soon after harvesting or preparing or one you have frozen it yourself, then it’s fine. With regards to quantities this is very simple. The amount of frozen fruit and frozen vegetables is exactly the same as allotted on your plan. When weighing frozen proteins such as fish, meat or seafood, you should always have an extra 25g more than listed in your plan, as there is a loss of water during thawing. For example: if you have 125g fish listed on your plan then you will need to have 150g of frozen fish.

MB 01-04 - grueneBohnen

Cardamom – a Precious Spice!

Its fragrance is without doubt a wonderful addition during the Holiday Season. Let us give you a few facts on this fabulous spice!

Green cardamom belongs to the ginger family and it originates from South India, Sri Lanka and Thailand. The plant is a reed-like shrub that can grow up to three metes (9′) high and it forms greenish-yellow seed pods on its branches. The pods have three compartments, with each one containing four to eight seeds that simply smell delicious. In the Middle Ages cardamom was known as a genuine treasure and today it is still one of the most expensive spices in the world after saffron and vanilla. The cardamom seeds are a popular coffee spice in Arabia and they also give curry and Asian dishes a special touch. You can either lightly squish the cardamom capsules and let them naturally enhance your dish or you can crush the pods to release the seeds, which can be ground into a powder using a mortar and pestle. Which ever way you add them though, you can be sure of a delicious dish.

MB 12-23 - Cardamon

What’s to Know About Pepper

Do you love pepper? We definitely do!

The peppercorns that we use as spice in our meals are from the Piperaceae family which has at least 700 different species! The pepper plant originally comes from the forests of southern India but is now cultivated in the tropics throughout the world. Black peppercorns with their thin, wrinkly skin are harvested and dried before they fully ripen. Nutritionally, black pepper is rich in piperine, which gives pepper its intense sharp taste. White pepper is made from fully ripe red pepper fruits, which are allowed to ferment. If the pulp is rubbed off after three days, the greyish-white, milder tasting round seeds appear. Green pepper is the unripe fruit that is placed in brine. No matter which one you use – (fresh) ground pepper is an excellent healthy addition in many aspects. Hot spices in general can support digestion and even kill pathogens. Of course those with a sensitive stomach or gastritis, should use peppery spices sparingly.

MB 12-18 - Muehle mit Pfeffer

What’s your favorite Okra Recipe?

Do you have okra on your food list? Have you tried it yet? Or are you a bit unsure what to do with it!? Let us help! 

Okra is a plant from the mallow family (so it’s related to hibiscus!) and originally comes from Ethiopia. Okra is actually the edible green seed pods of the plant so technically it could be called a fruit! 100g okra contain only 0.2g of fat and only 20 calories. It’s rich in beta-carotene, vitamin B1, B2 & B3 (niacin), vitamin C, calcium, magnesium, potassium, iron and phosphorus. One of Okra’s nutritional highlights is the high-quality gut-friendly mucilages, which are particularly valuable for healing our digestive tracts and supporting a healthy bacterial balance in the small intestine. They taste great in a ratatouille or a stir-fry where okra mixed with tomatoes, zucchini, parsley root, eggplants and carrots. 

Back to you – what do you think about Okra? What’s your favorite Okra recipe?

MB 12-07 - Okra