Silver Bullet Flax Seed Oil

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The super star among all eatable oils – often called the Happiness Oil. Recent research even assumes that flax seed oil has a preventive effect on diabetes and Alzheimer’s disease. However, this has not been proven.
Flax seed oil has an extremely high content of omega-3 fatty acid. Particularly worth mentioning is the alpha-linolenic acid, an important building block for the tissues of heart, retina and brain.
Flax seed oil has a fine nutty aroma, but is very sensitive and turns rancid quickly when exposed to light and air. Therefore, purchase flax seed oil in the smallest possible containers and store in the refrigerator. You will find that most containers on the market have a comparatively short shelf life.
Never heat flax seed oil! Use in salad, yogurt, or add after cooking to oatmeal or vegetables.

Mushrooms – Protein or Vegetable?

So you’ve got mushrooms in your Metabolic Balance nutrition plan: are they a protein or a vegetable? That is the question!

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Fish, meat, poultry, eggs and cow’s milk products are great proteins. Vegetarian proteins are soy, legumes, sprouts, nuts and seeds and some mushrooms. In the case of mushrooms, however, a distinction is made between those rich in protein and those considered a vegetable. At Metabolic Balance we distinguish between protein and vegetable based on the biological value of the mushrooms. This is calculated based on the amount of protein in a food that our bodies can use directly – basically this needs to be a good value for us to consider as a protein. 

The protein mushrooms are oyster and shiitake mushrooms. They can be used fresh or dried. Preparation suggestion can be fried in a wok or pan. They make a great mushroom risotto-style dish with a delicious cauliflower rice! All other mushrooms, such as button mushrooms, king oyster mushrooms, or chanterelles, are considered vegetables and can be combined with a protein.

Tomatoes – what makes them special at Metabolic Balance

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Many Metabolic Balance clients have little or no tomato listed on their personal nutrition plans.  There are a few different reasons why this might be the case. First, tomatoes naturally contain glutamate and other fruit acids which have an appetizing effect. Secondly, tomatoes contain oxalic acid (similar to rhubarb, beetroot and spinach). This is known to bind to calcium, and thus, it reduces the availability of calcium for absorption and hence for the body to use. People suffering from gout, rheumatism and with histamine intolerance are advised to avoid tomatoes, or at least eat them only occasionally. 

Born to be a Citrus Star – Lemon Peel!

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Have you ever thought of trying the often overlooked, or discarded peel from your citrus fruits for seasoning or garnishing your meals? If not, then we’d love to suggest it’s time you tried it! Right from the very beginning of your Metabolic Balance Program – no matter which of the four phases you’re in – you could use the citrus peel to wonderfully spice up your food. Of course, the fruit you choose, whether organic lemon, orange, grapefruit or mandarin would need to be listed on your plan!

Please note that we strongly recommend buying organic citrus fruits, as the peel of conventional fruits is unfortunately often high in pesticides or other chemicals.

Simply wash your chosen fruit, dab it dry and then either use a zest cutter to slice fine stripes, finely grate or peel the whole fruit, dry the peel and grind with a blender.

The fresh cut peel tastes refreshing, for example, in breakfast yogurt or oatmeal. It gives Asian dishes an excellent kick and is an absolute chef’s secret for livening up soups or salads. 

A final tip: Before grating, place a piece of parchment paper onto your grater so that the spikes push through and then grate your fruit. This avoids losing some of the delicious zest between the spikes of your grater. It makes cleaning easier, too!

Metabolic Balance Takes a Neutral Stand on Sunflower Oil

MB 08-06-2019

Due to its high vitamin E content, sunflower oil has a very long shelf life. It is almost tasteless, relatively inexpensive and is suitable for both, frying and cooking. However, it cannot be said to have exceptionally positive properties.

The Latest Trend: Coconut Flour

Once you’ve reached your health goal and are happily in Phase 4, the Maintenance Phase of Metabolic Balance, we’re happy to suggest that you can add coconut flour to your kitchen pantry. 

What’s so great about this latest trend?

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Coconut flour is a great alternative to conventional wheat flour. It is naturally gluten free and contains far fewer carbohydrates (only approx. 15%).  It’s notable for containing a fair protein content and an excellent level of insoluble fiber. One tablespoon of coconut flour contains about 5 g of fiber. 

Contrary to what you might think, coconut flour is actually low-fat. This is due to the manufacturing process where the majority of the natural fats in coconut is removed.  

So how can you use coconut flour? One way is to substitute it in baking as either part of the original amount of wheat flour or as all of the flour that needed. Also, as it has a high swelling capacity, it can be used as a thickener for soups, stews and sauces.

What is saffron …?

… and what do I use it for?

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Saffron originally comes from the Himalayas and the Hindu Kush. Saffron is extracted from the stigmas of a crocus species – the bulbous plant with the name autumn crocus (because it blooms in the northern hemisphere in autumn) – in a very laborious way and then has to be processed.  That is why real saffron is almost unaffordable and has been falsified in many ways for 500 years. Today it comes mainly from Spain, Southern France, Italy, Greece, Pakistan and Valais (Switzerland). Saffron contains saffron bitter picrococin (this substance has a toxic effect in large quantities).

It has a beneficial effect on digestion and acts as a cardio stimulant.
Saffron goes well in rice dishes, whether sweet or salty, and fits well for the preparation of sauces.