Parsnip – a True Fall Vegetable

Fall is parsnip time. Enjoy this delicious root vegetable in a yogurt soup!

MB 10-24 pastinake Ingredients for 1 serving:
1 serving yogurt
1 serving vegetables (parsnip, leek)
5 cm (2″) ginger
300 ml vegetable stock
Spices: salt, pepper, sweet paprika powder, a little oil

Preparation: wash and clean the vegetables and cut them into rough pieces. Brown the leek and the chopped ginger in oil and add the parsnips. Sauté everything for about 5 minutes, deglaze with broth and simmer for 10 minutes. Then season to taste and puree in a blender. Put approx. 2 TBsp. of yogurt aside (for your protein bite) and stir the rest into the soup. Finally season to taste and before serving season the remaining yogurt with paprika and garnish the soup with it.
Enjoy!

Health Starts in the Kitchen

MB 10-22 Health starts...

Healthy food and lifestyle is the most essential step to being healthy. A Metabolic Balance nutrition plan helps you to take this important step. Eating in line with Metabolic Balance means supplying your body with exactly the right nutrients in the right quantities. The result of this way of life is something to be proud of! Hundreds of thousands of satisfied clients agree: Metabolic Balance makes you healthier!

Find a local Metabolic Balance Coach to get Your Tailor-Made Nutrition Plan and improve your food intake and lifestyle!

Walnuts – Nutritious Power-House

MB 10-20 walnuts

Did you know that walnuts are a real power food?  They have a healthy fat content of approx 50% and the calorific value of 100g walnuts is over 2,700 kJ. The content of the essential fat alpha-linolenic acid (an omega-3 fat) is especially high. We call a fat “essential” as it’s one that our bodies can’t produce naturally and therefore must come from our food. Essential fats are known to offer a whole range of anti-aging and anti-inflammatory benefits. They keep the heart healthy by helping the blood vessels be flexible, prevent arteriosclerosis and have a positive influence on cholesterol levels.  

Walnuts are very rich in protein and therefore particularly valuable for vegetarians. A handful of walnuts (about 43g) provides 8g of vegetable proteins. They are also among the richest sources of antioxidants that help protect against cancer. They are rich in vitamins A, B1, B2, B3, C and E, pantothenic acid and important minerals such as zinc, potassium, magnesium, phosphorus, sulfur, iron and calcium. Walnuts also boost digestion, as they are very rich in fiber.

Nutrient-Packed Celery Root

Did you know that celery root is packed with great nutrients? Also known as celeriac, German Celery or knob celery is a fabulous autumn vegetable. It has a high proportion of essential oils, which give celeriac it’s distinct aroma. Celeriac has a high content of potassium, calcium, iron and phosphorus. In addition, B complex vitamins and vitamins C, E and A make it particularly valuable from a nutritional point of view. 

Continue to put celery root on your menu. It can be enjoyed in soups, stews, fried as pancake or raw in salads; it’s great as a side dish, mashed or pureed.

Mb 10-03 - celery root

Do you know that Pumpkin Seeds are a Sleep Aid?

Many have the “Seed Mix”, which is pumpkin and sunflower seeds, as a breakfast in their Metabolic Balance Nutrition Plan. Ever wondered how many benefits pumpkin seeds actually have? See in the following infographic [source]:

316311_10151201602367436_1092216911_n1 (countryandvictoriantimes.com)

Safflower Oil – yay or nay?

MB 09-11-2019

Safflower oil does not have an exceptionally good composition of omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids. It can therefore be used during the Metabolic Balance nutrition program, but is not one of the most recommended oils. Pay attention to quality here as well. Please never heat safflower oil.

Tomatoes – what makes them special at Metabolic Balance

MB 08-11-2019

Many Metabolic Balance clients have little or no tomato listed on their personal nutrition plans.  There are a few different reasons why this might be the case. First, tomatoes naturally contain glutamate and other fruit acids which have an appetizing effect. Secondly, tomatoes contain oxalic acid (similar to rhubarb, beetroot and spinach). This is known to bind to calcium, and thus, it reduces the availability of calcium for absorption and hence for the body to use. People suffering from gout, rheumatism and with histamine intolerance are advised to avoid tomatoes, or at least eat them only occasionally. 

Magnesium

The mineral Magnesium is vital to many of our body’s functions. Deficiency in magnesium may lead to sleep disturbances, irritability, rapid heartbeat, confusion, muscle spasms and may even play a role in upsetting the gastrointestinal tract. Even more reason to make sure that you get good quality of magnesium rich foods.

appetite-1238257_1920(Image by Robert-Owen-Wahl from Pixabay)

Image by Robert-Owen-Wahl from Pixabay

Ever wondered which foods are particularly high in magnesium? Check it out at Facty Health.

Time for Garden Vegetables! Goodies from Your Own Backyard …

MB (2019-06-19)

Peas directly from the shrub, carrots from your own garden and the small cucumber along the way – it can’t be tastier!  Why is it that way? Why does the carrot from your own garden taste so much sweeter and more delicious than the freshly bought one from the market?  We asked Mrs. Silvia Bürkle and she explains in depth: This is because this extremely fresh product contains more nutrients and, above all, considerably more flavors. Harvesting, storage and transport cause many vitamins and flavorings to be lost within the shortest time and this has its effect. In addition, the enzymes in the food are still active immediately after harvesting. They break down and alter nutrients, but also contribute to the food “decaying”.  Fresh food that we buy in the supermarket is often already a few days old and has traveled far. In this case the taste suffers. Maybe psychology also plays a role, allowing us to enjoy home-grown vegetables even more. Now is the best time to grow vegetables at home – depending on the type, harvesting season will start soon. We wish all hobby gardeners to enjoy their meal!

 

Feeling Stressed? Food Could Be Aggravating The Situation

Feeling a bit stressed? Maybe what you ate today is aggravating the situation.  Avoid the following when you know your day is going to be difficult or life starts feeling stressful:

  • Tea, coffee, cocoa, energy drinks
  • Fast foods
  • Milk
  • Meat, Fish and Poultry
  • Sugar
  • Alcohol
  • Soda, soft drinks and chocolate drinks

When you are following the metabolic balance plan, you will not be drinking soda or eating fast foods but coffee, nuts, butter and cheese may be on your plans.  Why avoid these foods?

Coffee –  the caffeine in coffee increases your stress hormones (catecholamines).  The stress response releases corisol which increases insulin.  Insulin increases inflammation in the body.  Here is an interesting research study that shows that daily doses of caffeine builds up a persons tolerance but does not eliminate the stress response.

Fast Foods –  Fast foods are highly processed, high in fat, sugar, or salt.  Stress may mess up our brain’s reward system or cortisol may cause us to crave more fat and sugar.  By putting fast food on your no eat list, you will help make sure Fast Food is not messing up your built in reward system. You will also avoid gaining extra weight which is a stressor for many adults.

Milk It seems that the issue with milk may be a specific sugar, D-galactose. Even a low dose of D-galactose has shortened the life span of test animals through oxidative stress damage, chronic inflammation, neurodegeneration, decreased immune response, and gene transcriptional changes.

Meat Fish and Poultry –  The study found that omnivores mood was changed much more by their food intake than vegetarians.  The study suggests a dietary ration of long chain fatty acids may have an effect on mood. If you are feeling stressed or want to feel a bit more emotionally balanced reduce the amount of meat in your diet.

SugarAlthough current research has explained why we crave sugar when stressed wait fifteen minutes before grabbing something to eat. According to this article, Keep your environment as positive as possible so you will not be tempted to eat sugar. Cravings will peak in 15 to 20 minutes so if you can distract yourself you may be able to avoid consuming sugar and allow your body to react naturally to stress.

Alcohol – 

When you feel stressed, eat nuts with one of your meals.  Here are two studies which talk about how two specific types of nuts help your health:

Pistachios may lower vascular response to stress in type 2 diabetes.

Walnut rich diet may reduce stress and bad cholesterol (If you buy them whole, you can also have the fun of cracking open the nuts with a German nutcracker like this:

Want to know more about stress and nutrition? Penn State is currently researching stress and nutrition if you want to participate as a volunteer. They are currently Current examining the effects of walnuts, canola oil, fatty acids, and culinary spices on cardiovascular responses to stress and vascular endothelial function.

Photo: Walnut by Erich Ferdinand