Sourdough Rye Bread

We are often asked: Why does Metabolic Balance recommend sourdough rather than bread containing yeast? 

MB 10-14 ryebread

The answer lies in the long fermentation process that happens with sourdough preparation. During this fermentation, the grain is properly broken down and the phytic acid effectively pre-digested. This is important as phytic acid is known to bind to the nutrients and minerals in the grain, thereby preventing us from absorbing them. Also reducing the phytic acid makes the bread lighter, healthier and easier to digest. Rye grains need a good long time to progress to it’s quality and be ready for baking. The sourdough method makes sure this happens naturally while boosting friendly bacteria in the dough which improves the shelf life of the rye bread. It also develops a wonderful taste and the delicious smell of fresh sourdough bread!

When yeast is added to bread dough, these natural processes are enormously accelerated, unfortunately to the detriment of the quality of the bread. This method of added yeast to bread baking makes it much harder for us to digest the bread and can cause digestive problems. 

Sourdough Rye Bread Recipe

This is a recipe for Sourdough Rye Bread used by Minnesotan Metabolic balancers. Barabara La Valleur, the blogger sharing the recipe with us.  Barabara likes to divide the recipe into individual muffins that equal one portion size to make her life a little easier.  If you would like to read her story about creating rye bread, you can read it here.

SourDough Rye Bread

Ingrediets:

  • 1 cup old fashioned oats
  • 1 tbsp honey (optional)
  • 1 tbsp sea salt
  • 2 tbsp olive oil
  • 2 1/2 cups water
  • 1 cup wild yeast
  • 6 1/2 cups rye flour

Instructions:

Mix together:

1 cup old fashioned oats

1 tablespoon of honey (optional)

1 tablespoon sea salt

2 tablespoons olive oil

Pour over and mix well:

2 Cups of boiling water

Add:

½ Cup of rye flour to this hot mixture immediately

1 Cup of wild yeast (Google How to make sourdough starter for recipe)

5-6 Cups of rye flour

½ Cup water

Mix all together until you have a tacky, but not sticky dough. [I keep extra flour and olive oil handy to add if dough is too sticky.]

Cover with a tea towel and leave for 10 minutes.

Knead the dough for 3-5 minutes with 45 minutes rest periods in between each time.

This primary fermentation process takes about 3 hours.

Gently knead the dough and shape as preferred in bread or muffin pans. If using muffin pans, it’s recommended you weight each one so they are all the same weight. Place in oiled and floured tin and leave to raise – at least 4 to 5 hours or overnight.

Preheat oven to 350 ° F [177 °C]  Bake for 40 minutes for muffins or 45 for loaf of bread. It is done when it sounds hollow when tapped underneath. Cool