Arugula

Whether in pesto, as a salad or on a pizza – arugula is not only very popular, but also very healthy. This leafy vegetable with a spicy and bitter flavor is rich in vitamin C and thus supports the immune system. In addition, arugula contains folic acid, other B vitamins, plenty of beta-carotene as well as potassium, iron, magnesium and calcium. The bitterness of this vegetable induces the rapid onset of salivary and digestive juices. The feeling of satiety is thus accelerated and we feel full faster, preventing cravings.

Rhubarb

Although many of us think of rhubarb as a fruit and use the stems similar to other fruits such as in a jam, compote, chutney or in cake, rhubarb is considered a vegetable.

Rhubarb is incredibly healthy and fits perfectly with Metabolic Balance. It contains large amounts of vitamin K and C, potassium, and calcium. This vegetable is also packed full of malic acids, various glycosides, tannins, essential oils and pectin which can be soothing for the intestine. Rhubarb is perfect for “internal cleansing”. The contained anthraquinones strongly stimulate the digestive system and have a laxative effect.

Mushrooms

We are often asked: Are mushrooms considered a protein source or a vegetable in Metabolic Balance nutrition plans? Well, it depends on the kind of mushroom. Oyster and shiitake mushrooms are considered a protein. They can be used fresh or dried and are delicious in soups, stir fries and salads. All other types of mushrooms are vegetables and can therefore be mixed and combined with another type of protein.

Leeks

You might be surprised to know that leeks are actually a member of the lily family! Leeks are a typical winter vegetable that have a light green color and are a milder and sweeter version of an onion. They contain vitamins B1 and C, and are abundant in iron, magnesium, calcium and phosphorus. Leeks are good for digestion, help stimulate the liver and gall bladder, and have been shown to lower blood sugar. Along with being very healthy, leeks are also an extremely versatile ingredient that can be used in many different dishes. You can slice it thinly and eat it raw or cook it and use it in a frittata, creamy soup, or pasta dish.

Crunchy Carrots

Carrots are a staple in many kitchens and today we have a few tips that all involve carrots!

Although baby carrots are a convenient option, try picking up large, regular carrots the next time you are at the store. Not only do these taste even more delicious than baby carrots but they also keep much better in the fridge. After shopping, carrots should be taken out of their packaging immediately and preferably stored in the vegetable drawer in the fridge. We also advise always removing the green leaves before storing, but don’t throw them away! Carrot leaves are far too good not to use – we suggest adding them to a green smoothie like this one. Simply blend the green stems from three carrots with 1.5 cups of water, 150g baby spinach, a peeled orange, a few chunks of mango and banana, and a tablespoon of cold pressed flax oil! This smoothie is not only delicious but also provides a great boost of energy.

By the way, did you also know that the alpha and beta carotenes in carrots are a precursor of vitamin A? This is what makes carrots so good for your skin. In addition, they contain B vitamins and vitamin E plus an excellent level of the minerals magnesium, phosphorus, calcium and iron as well as the fiber pectin.  

A final couple of tips: Always add a little oil to your carrot dishes, otherwise the fat-soluble vitamins they contain will not be able to be fully absorbed by your body.

 

Savoy Cabbage

Savoy cabbage or also known as curly cabbage is one of the prettiest and unique varieties of cabbage. It has green, slightly curly leaves and is less tightly packed than some of its relatives in the cabbage family. For a long time it wasn’t a very popular ingredient but has recently risen in prominence. As a vegetable it is extremely versatile and can be used in many dishes from soups and salads to wraps and lasagna. Savoy cabbage is also very healthy, packed full of vitamins C, B6, E, folic acid, as well as potassium, calcium, and iron. During your next trip to the grocery store pick up a savoy cabbage and try it out in some new dishes!

Brussel Sprouts

Brussels sprouts are walnut-sized and light to dark green – actually grape-like arranged buds of this cabbage plant. Like green cabbage, brussels sprouts taste best after the first frost, when their sugar content moderates their bitter taste and makes their cell structure more delicate. Usually brussels sprouts are cooked and tossed in butter as a side dish, but they also taste good in casseroles, as soup or very thinly sliced even raw. Brussels sprouts have 4.7 percent of valuable plant protein with amino acids that the body can easily utilize. It is also an excellent vitamin C donor in winter and also provides the vitamins B1, B2, B6, folic acid, iron, potassium and plenty of fiber. Brussels sprouts are also used in folk medicine to reduce both weakness and tension, to facilitate weight loss, to eliminate constipation and acidification, and to prevent atherosclerosis. With a glucosinolate content of 237 mg per 100 g of vegetables, it is also associated with cancer prevention!

Parsnips

The parsnip is by no means a boring root vegetable and is full of important vitamins and minerals such as calcium and magnesium. What many people may not know is that parsnips contain more potassium and vitamin C than carrots. Now as we are approaching the winter months, when the days are getting shorter and colder again, you should provide your body with enough healthy food – in this case parsnips! Is parsnip on your nutrition plan or have you ever tried it? Like for yes!

Vegan Chickpea Bolognese with Vegetable Noodles

Chickpeas are packed full of protein and pair perfectly with pasta. Give this delicious vegan and vegetarian recipe a try.

Ingredients:
1 serving of dried chickpeas
1 serving of vegetables (tomatoes, celery, carrot, zucchini, kohlrabi, onion, celery) 
Vegetable broth powder
Vegetable Noodles
Salt and pepper
1 clove of garlic
Olive oil 
Oregano
Thyme
Rosemary

Preparation:
Wash the chickpeas and soak them overnight, then drain and then process them in a food processor. Wash the vegetables and peel the carrot, celery, zucchini and kohlrabi into thin strips with a peeler. Then put the remaining end pieces and the celery into the food processor. Peel and chop the onion and garlic. Wash the tomatoes and dice them. Saute the chickpea mixture, add the diced onion, garlic and vegetable mixture. Season with vegetable stock powder, salt and pepper and cook thoroughly. Add the diced tomatoes and herbs and continue cooking for 15 minutes. In the meantime, cook the vegetable noodles in salted water and finally pour the sauce over them. Enjoy it!

Spinach

Let’s talk spinach! As kids many of us probably were not a big fan of this leafy, green vegetable.

Spinach is not only delicious but also packed with nutrients. In addition to a comparatively high iron content, it contains minerals such as potassium, calcium and magnesium. It is also rich in vitamins B and C. Especially in the kitchen, spinach is extremely versatile. It can be used in many ways, whether in salads, as pesto or quite classically in combination with a fried egg. Consider trying a new way to use this great vegetable!