Brussel Sprouts

Brussels sprouts are walnut-sized and light to dark green – actually grape-like arranged buds of this cabbage plant. Like green cabbage, brussels sprouts taste best after the first frost, when their sugar content moderates their bitter taste and makes their cell structure more delicate. Usually brussels sprouts are cooked and tossed in butter as a side dish, but they also taste good in casseroles, as soup or very thinly sliced even raw. Brussels sprouts have 4.7 percent of valuable plant protein with amino acids that the body can easily utilize. It is also an excellent vitamin C donor in winter and also provides the vitamins B1, B2, B6, folic acid, iron, potassium and plenty of fiber. Brussels sprouts are also used in folk medicine to reduce both weakness and tension, to facilitate weight loss, to eliminate constipation and acidification, and to prevent atherosclerosis. With a glucosinolate content of 237 mg per 100 g of vegetables, it is also associated with cancer prevention!

Parsnips

The parsnip is by no means a boring root vegetable and is full of important vitamins and minerals such as calcium and magnesium. What many people may not know is that parsnips contain more potassium and vitamin C than carrots. Now as we are approaching the winter months, when the days are getting shorter and colder again, you should provide your body with enough healthy food – in this case parsnips! Is parsnip on your nutrition plan or have you ever tried it? Like for yes!

Vegan Chickpea Bolognese with Vegetable Noodles

Chickpeas are packed full of protein and pair perfectly with pasta. Give this delicious vegan and vegetarian recipe a try.

Ingredients:
1 serving of dried chickpeas
1 serving of vegetables (tomatoes, celery, carrot, zucchini, kohlrabi, onion, celery) 
Vegetable broth powder
Vegetable Noodles
Salt and pepper
1 clove of garlic
Olive oil 
Oregano
Thyme
Rosemary

Preparation:
Wash the chickpeas and soak them overnight, then drain and then process them in a food processor. Wash the vegetables and peel the carrot, celery, zucchini and kohlrabi into thin strips with a peeler. Then put the remaining end pieces and the celery into the food processor. Peel and chop the onion and garlic. Wash the tomatoes and dice them. Saute the chickpea mixture, add the diced onion, garlic and vegetable mixture. Season with vegetable stock powder, salt and pepper and cook thoroughly. Add the diced tomatoes and herbs and continue cooking for 15 minutes. In the meantime, cook the vegetable noodles in salted water and finally pour the sauce over them. Enjoy it!

Spinach

Let’s talk spinach! As kids many of us probably were not a big fan of this leafy, green vegetable.

Spinach is not only delicious but also packed with nutrients. In addition to a comparatively high iron content, it contains minerals such as potassium, calcium and magnesium. It is also rich in vitamins B and C. Especially in the kitchen, spinach is extremely versatile. It can be used in many ways, whether in salads, as pesto or quite classically in combination with a fried egg. Consider trying a new way to use this great vegetable!

Pickled Mushrooms with Chili

 Yesterday we talked about how easy and delicious preserving foods at home can be. Today we have a recipe for you that shows you how!

Ingredients: 
1 serving of fresh mushrooms 
Twigs of fresh thyme
1 chili pepper
1/4 cup (65 mL) white wine vinegar
1/2 teaspoon mustard seeds
1 Tbsp. olive oil
Salt 

Ingredients:
Clean the mushrooms and then pat them dry. Pluck the thyme leaves. Cut the chilies into rings, removing the seeds. Add the vinegar and spices to a pot and bring to the boil. Add the mushrooms and cook for 5 minutes. Allow to cool and then pour into a glass that can be sealed well. Pour the olive oil over it and close the glas. After pickling, the mushrooms should continue to soak for at least 3 days.

Fennel

As we are leaving the summer months behind, delicious produce including fennel are coming into season. Originally from the Mediterranean area, where it is mainly grown as vegetable, it is now commonly found all across the US. Not only is it grown commercially but it is also found in meadows in the wild. You can recognize it by its finely feathered leaves, the typical fennel scent and bright yellow blossoms. As a healing herb, fennel has a lot to offer. The herb and seeds can have many health benefits including relieve menstrual cramps, relieve upset stomachs, aid in digestion, and boost the immune system. From a culinary point of view, opinions diverge regarding the fennel – some people love it and some do not like the taste at all! Stay tuned as tomorrow we will share one of our favorite recipes with you. Even if you normally do not like fennel, give this recipe a try because you will not be disappointed!

Infographic: LiveLoveFruit

Radishes. What Are They Good For?

We know you know red radishes and maybe white radishes but now is the time to hunt down some purple or black radishes at your local farmer’s market or health food store so that you can add a bit of pizzazz to your meals.

Whatever color radish you decide to buy, you can eat them raw, cooked or pickled.  It is   suggested you eat them raw to get the most nutritional value from the radish but raw radishes can be a little strong so adding them to a soup broth or simmering them until cooked will make them milder.

Why eat a Radish?

  • Radishes are very good for your stomach and act as a powerful detoxifier.
  • If you are constipated, try eating a radish. Radishes help facilitate digestion and soothe your digestive system.
  • As a natural diuretic, and detoxifier radish juice can help inflammation in the urinary tract and will help your kidneys by removing excess toxins.
  • Radishes are low in calories, high in roughage and contain large amounts of water which help keep you feeling satiated.
  • Packed with antioxidants, radishes are great for keeping your body healthy.
  • As an anti-congestive, radishes can help relieve irritation to the respiratory system caused from cold, infections and allegergies.
  • Because it is a good source of potassium, radishes can help reduce blood pressure and increase blood flow.
  • With a low glycemic index, radishes will not spike your sugar levels.
  • Your skin will thank you for eating a radish.  Radishes offer vitamin C, phosphorous, zinc, and plenty of water to hydrate your body. If you are suffering from skin rashes or dry skin, a smashed up radish used as a facial mask will help. Drinking radish juice is thought to help reduce acne and blemishes.
  • Radishes will help the body absorb beta-carotene so it is an excellent idea to eat a salad with grated carrots and radishes.

radish

 

metabolic balance Monday Recipe – Tomato Frittata

red tomatos

Ingredients:

  • 1 serving tomatoes, onion, arugula
  • 1 serving eggs
  • olive oil
  • salt, pepper and other seasonings

Instructions:

  • Preheat oven to 200c
  • Cut off the top of the tomato and clean out the entire inside of the tomato (All the mushy part with seeds. leave the meaty parts in place.)
  • Scramble the eggs in a bowl and add seasoning as desired. (I like adding Cilantro and Basil.)
  • Dice and Saute onions. Mix the onions into the eggs.
  • Pour the egg mixture into the tomato.
  • Brush olive oil onto the inside and outside of the tomato.
  • Back the tomatoes until the eggs are fully cooked.
  • When the tomato is cooked, place the arugula on a plate and put the tomato on top.
  • Serve with rye bread.

Note: If you are on a strict phase of metabolic balance, skip the olive oil.  If you want, you can add more vegetables but you cannot add any other proteins.  Also, instead of having the bread on the side, you can crumble the bread in a food processor and sprinkle the crumbs on top of the tomato before baking.

Tomato Fritatta