Grilled Skewers with Vegetables

As the weather is getting warmer, trusty grills are getting cleaned off and ready for the summer grilling season. One of the easiest things to grill are skewers and they are perfect for any Metabolic Balance plan!

All you need are wooden skewers, your protein of choice, and a few vegetables. Soak the wooden skewers in water for an hour and cut your protein (we recommend chicken) into cubes. Marinate the protein for a few hours with spices (paprika, rosemary, or garlic work well) and a hint of oil. Cut a few vegetables (such as peppers, zucchini, onions, and mushrooms) into similar sized cubes. Then skewer your protein and vegetables in alternating order and place on the grill until cooked.
Enjoy!

Tip Tuesday

Are you a fan of having a sauce with a dish or meal? Well we have you covered. Read below to learn about a simple way to make sauces that you can add to meals while on your Metabolic Balance plan.

One easy way to make a delicious sauce is to use a portion of the vegetable serving of your dish. Vegetables such as cauliflower, carrots, or broccoli are great options! Simply cook the vegetables until tender and then blend with some vegetable stock until smooth. Season to taste with herbs and spices. The sauce in the picture below was made with broccoli!

Cool as Cucumbers

Cucumbers are a wonderful vegetable. They consist of 97 percent of water, are very low in calories, have a mild taste and, as raw vegetables, go well with many dishes and almost every salad. In terms of vitamins and minerals, cucumbers are rich in carotene, vitamins E, K, B1, B2 and B6 and the minerals, calcium (15mg per 100g), phosphorus (25mg per 100g) and potassium (140mg per 100g). They can have a detoxifying effect on our bodies, by helping to reduce uric acid and acting as a diuretic. Fresh cucumbers are best stored in the refrigerator, separate from other vegetables (it’s best not to store them close to apples and melons).

Top tip: Clean the cucumber well and eat with the skin on! The skin is rich in silicic acid and can help strengthen our skin, hair and nails. Also aim, aim to shop locally, this allows you to not only get the freshest product possible but is also better for the environement.

Roasted Vegetables

Parsnips, Brussels sprouts, and many other vegetables – are delicious when roasted in the oven. Roasting brings out a vegetable’s natural sweetness and adds a wonderful charred flavor. Simply place your vegetables together in an ovenproof dish, drizzle with oil, season with salt and pepper, and cook al dente at 350CF (180°C) – with or without cheese!
Enjoy hot or cold, as an au gratin, added to salad, or simply as a side dish!

Introducing the Mighty Chard

Chard is great! From a biological point of view it is related to the beet family, but one main difference is that unlike red beets we don’t eat the roots. Instead we only eat the leaves and stems. Chard has a similar taste as spinach but with some spicier and nuttier undertones. There are many different varieties, but they only differ slightly in taste. In regards to its nutritional value, chard is a superstar. It is rich in protein as well as phosphorus, potassium, calcium, magnesium, iron, iodine and vitamins B1, B2 and C. It is also recognized as a medicinal plant because of its healing effect on anxiety and constipation. 

Consider trying this great vegetable as a side dish, salad, or adding it to a stir fry!

Exotic Vegetable Stir Fry

This vegetable stir fry is a perfect dish for spring and is suitable for phase 2 with oil.

Ingredients:
1 serving vegetables (we like cauliflower and carrots)
1 serving yogurt
1 serving chopped fruit
1 TBsp freshly chopped chives
cumin
turmeric
coriander
pepper
cinnamon
salt
coconut oil for frying

Preparation:
Clean the cauliflower and cut into florets. Peel carrots and cut them into fine strips. Cook the cauliflower in a little salted water with turmeric for about 7 minutes, then remove and drain. Heat the coconut oil in a pan, fry the cauliflower and carrots, and keep warm. Add the cumin, coriander, pepper and cinnamon to the frying oil and add the chopped fruit. Let the mixture cool down briefly, stir in the yogurt, and season to taste. Sprinkle with chives and enjoy!

Beans – Vegetables, or Protein?

In the case of beans, Metabolic Balance distinguishes between those which belong to the vegetable group and those which belong to the protein group:

Beans, which are considered a source of protein, are legumes (white beans, pinto beans, cannellini beans red kidney beans, lima beans, adzuki beans, black-eyed beans, etc. ). Beans that are classified as vegetables are green beans (string/green beans, French beans or Chinese long beans). There are also new varieties, such as yellow beans, which may also be used. The amount in the nutrition plan always refers to dry AKA uncooked weight. If using already cooked or pre-soaked protein beans, the indicated amount should be simply doubled.

Beef Tenderloin with Autumn Vegetables

Absolutely simple, but a real culinary delight: Beef tenderloin with autumn vegetables

MB 10-18 beefloin

Ingredients for 1 serving
1 serving beef tenderloin
1 serving mixed fall vegetables (pumpkin, mushrooms, kohlrabi, chard)
Spices: salt, pepper, rosemary, thyme

Preparation:
Sauté the beef tenderloin to how you like it (rare, medium or well done), season with salt and pepper and wrap in aluminium foil. Leave to rest for at least 15 minutes. 

Cut vegetables into right size for cooking, i. e. cut the pumpkin and kohlrabi smaller than the mushrooms and chard. 

Using the same pan in which the meat was sautéed, gently sauté your vegetables until cooked so that they have a pleasant brown color. Season the vegetables with salt, pepper, rosemary and thyme. Remove the meat from the foil and use the delicious juices as a sauce. 

Enjoy!

Time for Garden Vegetables! Goodies from Your Own Backyard …

MB (2019-06-19)

Peas directly from the shrub, carrots from your own garden and the small cucumber along the way – it can’t be tastier!  Why is it that way? Why does the carrot from your own garden taste so much sweeter and more delicious than the freshly bought one from the market?  We asked Mrs. Silvia Bürkle and she explains in depth: This is because this extremely fresh product contains more nutrients and, above all, considerably more flavors. Harvesting, storage and transport cause many vitamins and flavorings to be lost within the shortest time and this has its effect. In addition, the enzymes in the food are still active immediately after harvesting. They break down and alter nutrients, but also contribute to the food “decaying”.  Fresh food that we buy in the supermarket is often already a few days old and has traveled far. In this case the taste suffers. Maybe psychology also plays a role, allowing us to enjoy home-grown vegetables even more. Now is the best time to grow vegetables at home – depending on the type, harvesting season will start soon. We wish all hobby gardeners to enjoy their meal!

 

Radishes. What Are They Good For?

We know you know red radishes and maybe white radishes but now is the time to hunt down some purple or black radishes at your local farmer’s market or health food store so that you can add a bit of pizzazz to your meals.

Whatever color radish you decide to buy, you can eat them raw, cooked or pickled.  It is   suggested you eat them raw to get the most nutritional value from the radish but raw radishes can be a little strong so adding them to a soup broth or simmering them until cooked will make them milder.

Why eat a Radish?

  • Radishes are very good for your stomach and act as a powerful detoxifier.
  • If you are constipated, try eating a radish. Radishes help facilitate digestion and soothe your digestive system.
  • As a natural diuretic, and detoxifier radish juice can help inflammation in the urinary tract and will help your kidneys by removing excess toxins.
  • Radishes are low in calories, high in roughage and contain large amounts of water which help keep you feeling satiated.
  • Packed with antioxidants, radishes are great for keeping your body healthy.
  • As an anti-congestive, radishes can help relieve irritation to the respiratory system caused from cold, infections and allegergies.
  • Because it is a good source of potassium, radishes can help reduce blood pressure and increase blood flow.
  • With a low glycemic index, radishes will not spike your sugar levels.
  • Your skin will thank you for eating a radish.  Radishes offer vitamin C, phosphorous, zinc, and plenty of water to hydrate your body. If you are suffering from skin rashes or dry skin, a smashed up radish used as a facial mask will help. Drinking radish juice is thought to help reduce acne and blemishes.
  • Radishes will help the body absorb beta-carotene so it is an excellent idea to eat a salad with grated carrots and radishes.

radish