Daikon

Have you ever tasted Daikon Radish? Daikon (大根) literally means ‘big root’. If it is on your plan – how often did you eat it? We highly recommend that you have some whenever you can. Daikon originally comes from China but has a long history with many cultures. Together with garlic and onions, daikon was highly prized by the ancient Egyptians. They believed it was an essential food that protected their workers from infections and parasites. The Romans also kept themselves healthy by eating it regularly. Ironically, they considered the root to be “impure” as they believed it caused bad breath and flatulence! Daikon radish is extremely rich in vitamin C and has an antibiotic effect due to a sulphurous oil (raphanol), various mustard oils and the bitter substances it contains.

Daikon really is the perfect food for the cold and flu season!

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Pointed Cabbage

The tender cone of the Pointed cabbage: it’s small, fine and loosely wound – with these unique characteristics, the pointed cabbage has secured itself a special position in the cabbage family!  

As it’s naturally tender, it cooks quickly and does not need to be blanched even when using for stuffed cabbage. It also is a great addition when finely sliced into hearty and fruity-sweet salads. Make sure that it’s very fresh when you buy it, as the pointed cabbage doesn’t really have a long shelf life. Like the other members of the cabbage family, pointed cabbage is full of healthy nutrients, including vitamins C, B1, B2, potassium and beta-carotene. 

Our Top Tip: due to heat and cooking water, many nutrients can be lost. Therefore, simply finely cut some raw leaves and mix them under your other cooked vegetables.

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How do you like pointed cabbage?  Share your favorite recipes and tips with us (add to comments)! 

Fennel – Salad

This off-white colored vegetable is a great source of healthy carbs and fiber. And did you know that fennel has twice as much vitamin C than oranges!!! The amount of carotene (the precursor to Vitamin A) is also remarkable: with only one portion of fennel, we can cover our daily requirements. Fennel also has various B vitamins as well as the minerals potassium, calcium and phosphorus plus a great iron content. The essential oils athenol and fenchone have a beneficial, calming effect on the mucous membranes of the digestive tract and the lungs.

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This salad is a delicious source of vitamins!

Ingredients & Preparation for for four: wash, clean and cut two large fennel into strips. Arrange on plates. Peel two oranges, and arrange the orange segments on the fennel. Sprinkle with olive oil and wight balsamic vinegar to taste. Garnish with black olives and fennel greenery as desired.

Prepare for the Flu-Season!

Are you dreading the upcoming season of runny noses and watery eyes? Then we have a great tip for you: if you want to strengthen your immune system in fall, you should think about your nutrition. Studies show that especially vitamins A, C, E and beta carotene, but also the trace elements zinc and selenium as well as secondary plant extracts play a key role in fighting off colds and flu. These micro-nutrients activate the immune cells, stimulate the formation of antibodies and also influence the production of natural killer cells. So remember to add plenty of fresh fruit and vegetables to your daily menu! Citrus fruits, kiwi, sea buckthorn and rose hips are nutritious vitamin C provider. Sauerkraut and green bell pepper also contain many vitamins to support a healthy immune system.

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Do you know that Pumpkin Seeds are a Sleep Aid?

Many have the “Seed Mix”, which is pumpkin and sunflower seeds, as a breakfast in their Metabolic Balance Nutrition Plan. Ever wondered how many benefits pumpkin seeds actually have? See in the following infographic [source]:

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Born to be an All-Round Star

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Green cabbage is now available all year round. Particularly in the winter months it is a real blessing for your health with its valuable nutrients. And in summer it cuts a good figure. Whether spherical or longish – the robust vegetable that drives its stalk deep into the soil is particularly rich in folic acid and vitamin C. While many vegetables lose vitamin C during cooking, this doesn’t happen with green cabbage! This is because it also contains a lot of ascorbigen, a precursor of vitamin C. It is only converted to vitamin C during cooking. In addition, it supplies an excellent amount potassium for heart health, calcium for the bones and iron for the blood. And it’s doing all this while being low in calories and rich in fiber!