Anthocyanins Protect Against Heart Attack!

MB 09-14-2019

The Nurses’ Health Study was started in 1989 in Boston and followed the health of 93,600 nurses. It is one of the largest studies into the risk factors for major chronic diseases in women. One of the questions researchers posed was to look at heart attack risk among the group.  

Eric Rimm, a nutrition scientist from the Harvard School of Public Health, analyzed the data and was able to see a long-term trend that nurses in the study who ate at least three servings of blueberries or strawberries per week had a 32% reduced risk of a heart attack than the nurses who ate the berries less than once a month. It was concluded it was the presence of anthocyanins in the berries that was giving the nurses the great benefits for heart health. 

Anthocyanins are a natural groups of plant chemicals found in fruits such as berries, cherries, apples, but also eggplants. They give the fruits their rich, vibrant and dark color, and protect them from UV radiation and the oxygen in the air. It is now recognized that, when we eat these colorful foods containing anthocyanins, this protective effect is passed on to us!

Born to be a Kitchen Rose

MB 09-13-2019

Did you know that broccoli is a true nutrient booster? The full list of all the nutrients it contains is very long indeed. It’s also considered a complete list. We know everything that’s in it as this valuable vegetable has been completely researched by scientists. One of the most important nutrients is the essential trace element chromium. Chromium has a positive influence on insulin production, your blood sugar balance and overall metabolism. Broccoli also contains the indirect antioxidant sulforaphane, which, when eaten regularly, is considered to reduce the risk of cancer and protect the skin from harmful UV radiation. In addition to plenty of dietary fiber, broccoli has lots of vitamins C and E, provitamin A, potassium, calcium and iron. Due to its high content of Coenzyme Q10, broccoli is also said to have a rejuvenating and anti-ageing effect.

Fresh broccoli is dark to blue-green, compact and firm. Since it withers quickly and loses its valuable nutrients, it should be prepared and eaten soon after harvesting – preferably within three days.
Important: The shorter the cooking time, the more nutrients are kept!  So let’s get the florets, start cooking and enjoy!

30 Reasons for Healthy Nutrition: Long-Term Benefits

MB 09-12-2019

Due to the long-term change in nutrition with Metabolic Balance®, you plant the seed of health for your future. You will need less medication, orthopedic aids, care or other complex or expensive treatments. In return, you save time and money, two factors that you can better invest in your newly gained quality of life. There is hardly a greater benefit than to enjoy a healthy and unlimited freedom and feel independent of restrictions.

Find your local Metabolic Balance Coach to start!

Safflower Oil – yay or nay?

MB 09-11-2019

Safflower oil does not have an exceptionally good composition of omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids. It can therefore be used during the Metabolic Balance nutrition program, but is not one of the most recommended oils. Pay attention to quality here as well. Please never heat safflower oil.

Oh so Yummy: Stuffed Mushrooms

MB 09-10-2019

Ingredients for 1 person:
1 serving goat cheese
1 serving vegetables (big button mushrooms, spinach, cubed onion)
Spices: rock salt, fresh ground pepper, nutmeg, garlic (1 glove), fresh parsley, 1 TBsp oil

Preparation:
Cut the goat cheese into small cubes. Clean the mushrooms and remove the stalk. Clean, wash and blanch spinach in salt water, rinse with cold water, squeeze and cut into stripes. Slice the skin of the tomato, briefly put it into boiling water, rinse with cold water, peel, remove seeds and cut into cubes. Brown the cubed onion in oil, add the mushrooms and sauté for 5 minutes. Remove the mushrooms and place in an ovenproof dish. Mix the onions with chopped garlic, vegetables and season to taste. Add and mix in the cheese, then fill the mixture into the mushrooms. Place in the oven at 180°C (355°F) for about 20 minutes.

Enjoy your meal!

Culinary and Glamorous: these Stuffed Artichokes are a Real Treat

MB 09-09-2019
Ingredients:
1 serving cooked ham
1 serving vegetables (artichokes and mushrooms)
1 lemon
spices & herbs: salt, freshly ground pepper, freshly chopped parsley
olive oil or coconut oil

Preparation:
Remove the scale-like leaves from the artichoke and break off the stalk. This requires a little effort, but please do not cut it off, as the inedible fibers will be removed from the bottom by the breaking (it’s also called “hay”). Cut off the upper first third and remove the middle leaves, now you can remove the inedible “hay” (with small artichokes you have very little of it).  Place the cleaned artichokes immediately in lemon water.
Cut ham and mushrooms into small cubes and sauté in oil, season with salt and pepper. Remove from pan, add parsley, fill artichokes and place in a pot with some oil. Cover and cook at low heat for about 35-45 minutes, pour some water over the filling from time to time to prevent it from drying out.

Enjoy your meal!

Born to be an All-Round Star

MB 09-08-2019

Green cabbage is now available all year round. Particularly in the winter months it is a real blessing for your health with its valuable nutrients. And in summer it cuts a good figure. Whether spherical or longish – the robust vegetable that drives its stalk deep into the soil is particularly rich in folic acid and vitamin C. While many vegetables lose vitamin C during cooking, this doesn’t happen with green cabbage! This is because it also contains a lot of ascorbigen, a precursor of vitamin C. It is only converted to vitamin C during cooking. In addition, it supplies an excellent amount potassium for heart health, calcium for the bones and iron for the blood. And it’s doing all this while being low in calories and rich in fiber! 

Kohlrabi Viennese Style: Today We Enjoy a Metabolic Schnitzel 

MB 09-07-2019

Ingredients:
1 serving Kohlrabi (turnip cabbage)
Spices: salt, pepper, a dash of nutmeg
1 serving rye crisp bread
1 serving egg(s)

Preparation:
Wash, clean and slice the Kohlrabi (turnip cabbage). Blanch in boiling salt water, remove, drain and season with salt, pepper and nutmeg.
Grind the crispbread with a hand blender or kitchen aid to flour and whisk the egg. Season the Kohlrabi slices, cover with egg and rye crisp bread and fry on both sides.
Whisk the remaining egg, salt, pepper and fry to scrambled eggs.

Enjoy your meal! 

Regulate Your Acid-Alkaline Balance!

MB 09-06-2019

Did you know how important our acid-alkaline balance (ph-balance) is for our metabolism? Our western diet (often with too little fresh food, too much coffee and alcohol) and lifestyle (too little exercise) is generally very acidic. If the equilibrium of the acid-alkaline balance is too acidic then our metabolism also goes out of balance. An over-acidified metabolism breaks down less fat, is much slower and draws valuable minerals from bones and cartilage to neutralize acids. This can accelerate degenerative joint diseases such as rheumatism and osteoarthritis. We cannot assess from the flavor of foods which foods are acidic for the body. For example, lemon, which is sour, has a nice alkalizing effect on the body, whereas chocolate, which is sweet, has an acidic effect. 

If you want to know if your body is too acidic, you can buy urine test strips at the pharmacy and simply test your acid-base levels daily. These may be ideal to check in which state your acid-alkaline balance before and while on your personal Metabolic Balance nutrition plan. You can also support your body with regular alkaline baths and alkaline body-lotions and creams.

Born to be a Cardio Star – Brussels Sprouts!

MB 09-05-2019 (2)

Brussels Sprouts: so often not the most popular in the room, but its taste is far better than its reputation. 

The florets are walnut-sized and light to dark green. Like green cabbage, Brussels sprouts taste best harvested after the first frost when their sugar content reduces their strong taste and makes their cell structure softer. Brussels sprouts are usually eaten cooked as a side dish, but they can also be added to casseroles and soups, baked in the oven or cut very thinly and lightly sautéed or even eaten raw. Brussels sprouts have a valuable 4.7% of plant protein with amino acids that the body can utilize well. It is also an excellent source of vitamin C in winter and also contains many nutrients, namely vitamins B1, B2, B6, folic acid, iron, potassium and plenty of fiber. Brussels sprouts are used in traditional folk medicine to reduce both conditions of muscle weakness and tension, they can assist weight loss, improve constipation and acidosis and prevent atherosclerosis.  They also have an impressive amount of a well recognized anti-cancer plant chemical, glucosinolate (237 mg per 100 g of vegetables). Thus, Brussels sprouts are a star in cancer prevention too! This is a real star among vegetables!