Ceviche

We all know Sushi but have you tried Ceviche? The Peruvian national dish has been becoming more popular lately. It is basically just a simple fish fillet served with fruit or vegetables. It’s just the way we at Metabolic Balance like to eat!

Unlike with Japanese sushi, with Ceviche the fish is not really eaten raw. Marinated in lemon and lime juice, the protein is broken down and denatured, which basically leads to a natural cooking effect. Together with crunchy fresh vegetables or fruit, the dish tastes wonderfully light – avocados, onions or peppers go particularly well.

MB 11-20 - ceviche

Fit For The Cold?

It’s not only your immune system that needs support in the colder months, we also need to look after our skin. Cold weather plus indoor heating is the perfect combination to dry your skin. The skin vessels narrow, the production of our natural oils in the skin, sebum, is reduced and the formation of the central skin barrier is lowered. This all adds up to uncomfortable, dry, brittle and cracked skin.

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What can you do to radiate healthy skin and vitality even in winter? We recommend a combination of internal and external tender, loving care for your skin. First, make sure you keep your omega 3 fatty acids in your daily essentials. Look for great sources from either oily fish and cold-pressed oils such as flax seed oil and rapeseed oil. It is also important that you stay properly hydrated. Even if you’re not as thirsty in the winter, you still need to make sure that you drink enough water. We recommend herbal teas, ginger water and mineral water or even a simple cup of hot water!

Belgium Endive Boats with Tofu Bacon on Balsamic Reduction

Today`s recipe is just yummy!

MB 11-17 Chiccore

Ingredients:
1 portion smoked tofu
1 portion vegetables (chicory, arugula, red onion)
Herbs & Spices: fresh rosemary, freshly ground pepper, salt
vegetable stock, balsamic vinegar, oil

Preparation: Carefully remove the single chicory leaves, which will be our “boats”. Wash them as well as the arugula. Peel the red onion and cut into fine cubes. In a small pan, heat 2 TBsp. of olive oil together with a twig of rosemary and gently fry the onion cubes until golden yellow. Now add approx. 10 TBsp. balsamic vinegar and reduce over low heat until the vinegar has a creamy consistency. Season with a pinch of pepper and vegetable stock and keep warm.
While the vinegar is reducing, cut the smoked tofu into very small cubes and add a TBsp. of oil to another pan. When the oil is hot, toss another sprig of rosemary in for about 1 minute and then add the smoked tofu cubes. Fry the tofu at high heat for about 5 minutes until it gets a bacon aroma. Now arrange 4-5 chicory boats on the plate, fill them with some arugula leaves and drizzle with the reduction. Finally sprinkle the smoked tofu bacon generously over the top.

Enjoy!

Eat Like You Love Yourself !

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When we love something, we tend to treat it well. For our loved ones, we would do ANYTHING & EVERYTHING! But sadly it’s a simple fact that too often we don’t do this for ourselves … time, stress and general business often stops us from looking after ourselves properly.

It’s time this changed! We need to start loving ourselves enough to give ourselves the best food and nutrients possible to be healthy and well. Your body will thank you with renewed energy and a fantastic zest for life.

Get in contact with a certified Metabolic Balance Coach!

The Metabolic Balance App

Have you had your personal Metabolic Balance nutrition plan created after January 1st, 2018? Yes? Wonderful! Contact your coach and find out how to get your plan on your mobile phone. We just released the Metabolic Balance App!

App-Overview

You do not have a personal Metabolic Balance nutrition plan but are interested in finding out what tailor-made nutrients can do for your health? Look for a local certified Metabolic Balance Coach!

Popular Peanuts!

Peanuts are very popular at Metabolic Balance. But what makes them so valuable? Although their name suggests otherwise, they aren’t nuts! They’re actually a type of legume. Originally found in the Andes, today they are mainly grown in the U.S., Argentina, Brazil, Sudan and Senegal. The stems of the peanut plant dig themselves into the soil after the flowers are pollinated. This is where the seeds ripen in a woody shell and hey presto we get peanuts! 

Peanuts eaten raw actually taste like beans and only get their familiar peanutty smell through roasting. With 25-35% protein and 42-52% fat, peanuts are pretty high in calories; however, this is not bad! The fat provides a great source of the heart-friendly and essential fat, linoleic acid. Peanuts are also rich in vitamin E and most of the B vitamins (not B12), many minerals (iron, phosphorus, potassium, calcium and magnesium) and valuable trace elements such as copper, manganese, zinc and fluorine. 

Take a little baggy of peanuts in your purse for a great quick snack when you’re out and about!

MB 11-12 - peanuts

Bitter Tasting Foods to Fight Cravings!

There’s an old German saying, “What’s bitter for the mouth, is healthy for the stomach”. And we totally agree! However many naturally bitter salad leaves and vegetables are not as bitter as they once were. Instead due to modern farming and the types of plants farmed today, many of our bitter foods are nowadays much milder, sweeter or sour.

So why is this important? 

The plant components that give a bitter taste have been increasingly researched in recent years and have been shown to have many important functions for the human bodies. For example we now know that the bitter phytochemicals have very beneficial digestive characteristics and can help support and strengthen a healthy liver. 

MB 11-11 - raddiccio

The health benefits can also start from the minute the sensitive taste buds on the tongue come into contact with bitter foods. This kick-starts a cascade of digestive benefits including the production of digestive juices in the stomach and boosting the function of both the gallbladder and the pancreas.

But what many people don’t realize is that these strongly alkaline and bitter substances act like a natural suppressant towards damaging sugary foods. The “bitter” taste naturally reduces the desire for sweet foods! So try to eat many sources of bitter foods that naturally help stop those cravings for sweets!

Eat Right & Feel Amazing

MB 11-10 - eat right

The positive feedback from our clients confirm: with Metabolic Balance you know what to eat to be happy. 

Top comments include: after a short period of time you start to simply feel so much better. The pounds tumble, fitness increases and you simply feel comfortable in your body.  

Support your unique body with the right food and experience your best quality of life! Connect with your local certified Metabolic Balance Coach, who can assist you to have your personal Metabolic Balance Nutrition Plan!

Zinc – an Essential Nutrient for a Strong Immune System

Zinc is a chemical element which is one of the body’s vital trace elements. Since zinc cannot be stored by our body, a regular supply is particularly important. In healthy people, the daily requirement of zinc can be normally met from a good balanced diet. Good sources of zinc are most meats, eggs, oysters, oat meal, cashew and Brazil nuts as well as lentils and peas.

One vital role of zinc is for eye health: a chronic zinc deficiency may lead to night blindness. In addition, zinc is vital for many other processes in our body including cell division and cell repair processes. As a free radical scavenger, zinc prevents aggressive chemical compounds from damaging body cells. We need zinc to keep our skin and mucous membranes healthy and it’s essential for our immune system. So our No.1 tip … make sure you eat plenty of sources of zinc on your weekly meal plan, especially during the flu season.

MB 11-08 - Zink-Abwehrkraft

What to know about Red Cabbage

MB 11-07 - Rotkohl

So what do you know about red cabbage? Let us fill you in on this excellent versatile vegetable! Firstly it’s available all year round now! However, it’s most popular in autumn and winter as a classic side dish to game, duck and roast goose or turkey.  It’s red coloring is not cultured, but a variation of nature. In traditional medicine it was believed that red cabbage had a positive effect on blood. Compresses made from red cabbage leaves are said to have alleviated varicose veins, phlebitis and leg ulcers. Red cabbage contains the pigment anthocyanin – also found in red berries and red wine – which has an antioxidant and anti-inflammatory effect. It has been shown in numerous studies that this flavonoid has cancer-inhibiting and cholesterol-lowering effects and is also linked to reduced risk of heart attacks and strokes. Red cabbage is rich in many vitamins and fiber and is an important immune booster during the cold season. It contains above all the vitamins C, B6 and E. 

Tip: to preserve the beautiful rich color of red cabbage, add some vinegar or citric acid when cooking.