Toxins and the Body

The current generation is exposed to more toxic chemicals and substances than any other previous generation. Exposure to toxins can lead to many different diseases and health problems. Thus it is important to understand how the body gets rid of toxins and what toxins we are exposed to in our daily life that we can avoid.

The body has 6 main ways or avenues to remove and eliminate toxins:

Liver: This organ is the major player in helping the body eliminate toxins by inactivating toxic substances and removing toxic substances and metabolites.

Kidneys: The kidneys are crucial in filtering the blood and eliminating toxic medications, waste products, and harmful chemicals.

Intestines: The gut although most often associated with digestion is another important avenue for toxin removal via the stool.

Respiratory Tract: Another way the body removes toxins is in the lungs via coughing and the removal of phlegm.

Skin: The largest organ in the body, the skin, is exposed to toxins everyday in many of the products we use including hair products, soap, and laundry detergent. This means the skin must have good ways to remove these toxins and primarily does this in the form of sweat.

In order for the body to function properly, limiting exposure to toxins and ensuring that your body is able to remove toxins is very important. To learn more about how to detoxify your life check out the links below.

https://www.huffpost.com/entry/dangerous-beauty-products_b_4168587

https://www.womensvoices.org/avoid-toxic-chemicals/ten-ways-to-avoid-toxic-chemicals/


Picture: Womens Best


The Impressive Pineapple

The pineapple originally comes from South America and Hawaii but is now commonly grown in many warm and tropical regions. This fruit not only tastes delicious but also contains high amounts of bromelain, an enzyme which breaks down proteins. This enzyme can have phenomenal effects on the body: it inhibits blood coagulation, improves blood circulation, has an anti-inflammatory effect, lowers blood pressure and helps to break down deposits on the inner walls of the blood vessels. Note though that this enzyme is broken down when heated, so cooked pineapple will no longer contain active bromelain. In addition to bromelain, pineapples contain almost all essential vitamins as well as important minerals and trace elements. No matter how you enjoy pineapple, in sweet or savory dishes, this superfood is worth incorporating into your diet.

Avocado

Avocados have increased in popularity in the US since the early 2000’s and are now a staple in many households. What many people may not know is that they are one of the most nutrient dense and healthy fruits! Not a vegetable, avocado is the only fruit that contains high levels of healthy monounsaturated fatty acids. In addition, avocados contain high amounts of fiber, are a great source of vitamins C, K, B6, and are rich in magnesium, potassium, and omega-3 fatty acids. Although most of the calories are derived from fats, these are all healthy fats that the cells in your body need for essential metabolic processes.

Avocados are extremely versatile and can be used in many different dishes. Try them mashed on toast, blended into a pasta sauce, on top of a salad, or even in a creamy chocolate pudding. The possibilities are endless!

Picture: Lemonly

Body Fat

Let’s talk body fat! Although fat has been stigmatized by the diet industry not all fat is bad. It is important to have a healthy amount of body fat for regulating body temperature, balancing hormones, storing vitamins, and for good overall health. Body fat starts to be not as great when we have too much of it! Too much fat can lead to inflammation in the body and increase your risk for different diseases. To learn more check out this great video below.

Beets and Cheese

Yesterday we wrote about the nutritional benefits of beets, so today we have a simple recipe for you that highlights this great vegetable.

Ingredients:
1 serving of beets
1 serving of soft cheese
1 Tbsp. onions
1 garlic clove
Vegetable stock
1 piece of fresh ginger

Preparation:
Dice the onions finely and sauté in vegetable stock. Coarsely grate or dice the beets. Finely chop the garlic and ginger (quantity to taste) and add to the onions together with the beets. Cook briefly and mix well with the onions. Cut the cheese into slices. Set the stove to its lowest setting or turn it off and spread the cheese over the vegetables in thin slices. Allow the cheese to melt, then enjoy!

Nutty Vegetable Dip

This dip is great for dipping vegetable sticks and is a great quick meal.

Ingredients:
1 serving of spread made from pumpkin/sunflower seeds
2 Tbps. of fresh chopped herbs (rosemary, oregano, basil, etc.)
50 g cucumber
100 mL (~1/2 cup) olive oil
2 cloves of garlic
Fresh chili pepper
Salt and pepper

Preparation:
Roast the seeds in a dry pan and then set aside to cool down. Peel the garlic cloves, wash chili pepper and cucumber and cut everything into small pieces. Place all ingredients in food processor or blender and puree until smooth. Season with salt and pepper. Pour into a glass and pour a bit of the remaining oil over top. Serve with vegetables sticks and enjoy!

Rose Hip – more than just Tea!

Everyone knows the rose-hip! As an “itchy powder”, it made life difficult for many kids! In Germany, they even sing about the rose-hip: August Hoffmann von Fallersleben wrote a nursery rhyme about it, which goes, “A little man stands in the woods, with a black cap on and clothed in beautiful orange-red, who can it be? Ah, it must be a rose-hip” and so on (very freely translated). However, scirose-hip-2687207_960_720ence today knows better than ever that the rose-hip has much more to offer. The rose-hip is known to be one of the native plants that’s richest in vitamin C – only the acerola cherry or the exotic Camu fruit have a higher content. Our ancestors also appreciated the rose-hip and its ingredients – it was considered to be a medicinal plant for various illnesses in ancient times. It usually has a permanent place in the kitchen too, because its refreshing taste makes it ideal for the preparation of jams and liqueurs, but our best-known form of the fruit is rose-hip tea.

This little reddish fruit, often referred to as wild rose, is usually found in bushes and hedges. The rose-hip variety Rosa Canina was used in the monastic medicine of the Middle Ages, when it was considered useful for treating colds and complaints in the gastrointestinal tract. Its ingredients, such as vitamin C, pro-vitamin A, B vitamins, minerals, trace elements, secondary plant substances and galactolipid, which are all present in significant quantities in the fruit, are at the root of its healing effects.

Clinical studies conducted by the Danish physician and biochemist Dr. med. Kay Winther, have proven the effects that wild rosehip ingredients can have. In their research, the scientists focused on the ingredient galactolipid. Galactolipid is composed of fatty acids and sugars and is an important substance for relieving joint pain. It mitigates inflammatory joint diseases by inhibiting the migration of the white blood corpuscles into the inflamed region, preventing more cartilage tissue damage. Galactolipid is also capable of blocking inflammatory parameters, such as the CRP (C-reactive protein), which promotes inflammation.

As a further positive side effect, the scientists were also able to prove that LDL cholesterol, which is responsible for the formation of deposits in blood vessels, was significantly reduced by the regular intake of rosehip powder.

To obtain enough of the active ingredients, especially galactolipid, the whole rose hip must be carefully processed, i.e. the fruits must be dried at a maximum of 40° C. But rosehip tea or jam alone can’t improve inflammatory symptoms – the whole fruit, with skin and kernel, must be ground up. This is the only way to obtain a high-quality rosehip powder with a high galactolipid content. Picking and eating the rosehip raw straight from the shrub won’t taste too great either, because the rosehip has a very high proportion of tannins. It’s best to mix up the rosehip powder with your muesli and take it in juices, yoghurts or smoothies. The daily recommended intake is between 5 and 10 grams.

Rose-hip powder isn’t the only rose-hip product that has a pronounced positive effect on our health – rose-hip seed oil is also very healthy for us. It’s a popular oil in the cosmetics sector, because it can be easily incorporated into creams, soaps and ointments. The oil of the rose-hip seeds also stimulates the healing process of skin injuries, and it can even provide fast relief for itchy, cracked and brittle skin. Transretionary fruit acid in the oil is responsible for this healing property. It stimulates the skin to regenerate itself and builds up new collagen at the same time.

Silvia Bürkle

Radishes. What Are They Good For?

We know you know red radishes and maybe white radishes but now is the time to hunt down some purple or black radishes at your local farmer’s market or health food store so that you can add a bit of pizzazz to your meals.

Whatever color radish you decide to buy, you can eat them raw, cooked or pickled.  It is   suggested you eat them raw to get the most nutritional value from the radish but raw radishes can be a little strong so adding them to a soup broth or simmering them until cooked will make them milder.

Why eat a Radish?

  • Radishes are very good for your stomach and act as a powerful detoxifier.
  • If you are constipated, try eating a radish. Radishes help facilitate digestion and soothe your digestive system.
  • As a natural diuretic, and detoxifier radish juice can help inflammation in the urinary tract and will help your kidneys by removing excess toxins.
  • Radishes are low in calories, high in roughage and contain large amounts of water which help keep you feeling satiated.
  • Packed with antioxidants, radishes are great for keeping your body healthy.
  • As an anti-congestive, radishes can help relieve irritation to the respiratory system caused from cold, infections and allegergies.
  • Because it is a good source of potassium, radishes can help reduce blood pressure and increase blood flow.
  • With a low glycemic index, radishes will not spike your sugar levels.
  • Your skin will thank you for eating a radish.  Radishes offer vitamin C, phosphorous, zinc, and plenty of water to hydrate your body. If you are suffering from skin rashes or dry skin, a smashed up radish used as a facial mask will help. Drinking radish juice is thought to help reduce acne and blemishes.
  • Radishes will help the body absorb beta-carotene so it is an excellent idea to eat a salad with grated carrots and radishes.

radish