Rose Hip – more than just Tea!

Everyone knows the rose-hip! As an “itchy powder”, it made life difficult for many kids! In Germany, they even sing about the rose-hip: August Hoffmann von Fallersleben wrote a nursery rhyme about it, which goes, “A little man stands in the woods, with a black cap on and clothed in beautiful orange-red, who can it be? Ah, it must be a rose-hip” and so on (very freely translated). However, scirose-hip-2687207_960_720ence today knows better than ever that the rose-hip has much more to offer. The rose-hip is known to be one of the native plants that’s richest in vitamin C – only the acerola cherry or the exotic Camu fruit have a higher content. Our ancestors also appreciated the rose-hip and its ingredients – it was considered to be a medicinal plant for various illnesses in ancient times. It usually has a permanent place in the kitchen too, because its refreshing taste makes it ideal for the preparation of jams and liqueurs, but our best-known form of the fruit is rose-hip tea.

This little reddish fruit, often referred to as wild rose, is usually found in bushes and hedges. The rose-hip variety Rosa Canina was used in the monastic medicine of the Middle Ages, when it was considered useful for treating colds and complaints in the gastrointestinal tract. Its ingredients, such as vitamin C, pro-vitamin A, B vitamins, minerals, trace elements, secondary plant substances and galactolipid, which are all present in significant quantities in the fruit, are at the root of its healing effects.

Clinical studies conducted by the Danish physician and biochemist Dr. med. Kay Winther, have proven the effects that wild rosehip ingredients can have. In their research, the scientists focused on the ingredient galactolipid. Galactolipid is composed of fatty acids and sugars and is an important substance for relieving joint pain. It mitigates inflammatory joint diseases by inhibiting the migration of the white blood corpuscles into the inflamed region, preventing more cartilage tissue damage. Galactolipid is also capable of blocking inflammatory parameters, such as the CRP (C-reactive protein), which promotes inflammation.

As a further positive side effect, the scientists were also able to prove that LDL cholesterol, which is responsible for the formation of deposits in blood vessels, was significantly reduced by the regular intake of rosehip powder.

To obtain enough of the active ingredients, especially galactolipid, the whole rose hip must be carefully processed, i.e. the fruits must be dried at a maximum of 40° C. But rosehip tea or jam alone can’t improve inflammatory symptoms – the whole fruit, with skin and kernel, must be ground up. This is the only way to obtain a high-quality rosehip powder with a high galactolipid content. Picking and eating the rosehip raw straight from the shrub won’t taste too great either, because the rosehip has a very high proportion of tannins. It’s best to mix up the rosehip powder with your muesli and take it in juices, yoghurts or smoothies. The daily recommended intake is between 5 and 10 grams.

Rose-hip powder isn’t the only rose-hip product that has a pronounced positive effect on our health – rose-hip seed oil is also very healthy for us. It’s a popular oil in the cosmetics sector, because it can be easily incorporated into creams, soaps and ointments. The oil of the rose-hip seeds also stimulates the healing process of skin injuries, and it can even provide fast relief for itchy, cracked and brittle skin. Transretionary fruit acid in the oil is responsible for this healing property. It stimulates the skin to regenerate itself and builds up new collagen at the same time.

Silvia Bürkle

Radishes. What Are They Good For?

We know you know red radishes and maybe white radishes but now is the time to hunt down some purple or black radishes at your local farmer’s market or health food store so that you can add a bit of pizzazz to your meals.

Whatever color radish you decide to buy, you can eat them raw, cooked or pickled.  It is   suggested you eat them raw to get the most nutritional value from the radish but raw radishes can be a little strong so adding them to a soup broth or simmering them until cooked will make them milder.

Why eat a Radish?

  • Radishes are very good for your stomach and act as a powerful detoxifier.
  • If you are constipated, try eating a radish. Radishes help facilitate digestion and soothe your digestive system.
  • As a natural diuretic, and detoxifier radish juice can help inflammation in the urinary tract and will help your kidneys by removing excess toxins.
  • Radishes are low in calories, high in roughage and contain large amounts of water which help keep you feeling satiated.
  • Packed with antioxidants, radishes are great for keeping your body healthy.
  • As an anti-congestive, radishes can help relieve irritation to the respiratory system caused from cold, infections and allegergies.
  • Because it is a good source of potassium, radishes can help reduce blood pressure and increase blood flow.
  • With a low glycemic index, radishes will not spike your sugar levels.
  • Your skin will thank you for eating a radish.  Radishes offer vitamin C, phosphorous, zinc, and plenty of water to hydrate your body. If you are suffering from skin rashes or dry skin, a smashed up radish used as a facial mask will help. Drinking radish juice is thought to help reduce acne and blemishes.
  • Radishes will help the body absorb beta-carotene so it is an excellent idea to eat a salad with grated carrots and radishes.

radish

 

Grilled Avocado Recipe with Salsa Filling – metabolic balance Monday Recipe

Avocado Ingredients:

  • Avocado
  • olive oil
  • salt for seasoning

Salsa Ingredients:

  • diced tomatoes(seeds removed)
  • diced red onion
  • cilantro
  • salt
  • pepper
  • shredded carrots

Instructions for  grilled avocado slices:

  • Cut avocado in half and remove the seed and peel.
  • Slice each half into slices.
  • Brush with olive oil.
  • Place for two minutes on each side
  • Season to taste.
  • Serve on Rye bread or rye crisps with salsa on top.

Instructions for grilled Avocado halves:

  • Cut avocado in half and remove seed. Keep the peel on.
  • Lightly brush olive oil on each open side of the avocado.
  • place the avocado on the grill with the meat side down.
  • Grill for about 2 minutes.
  • Season to taste.
  • Fill the avocado with Salsa and serve using the avocado as a small bowl.

Instructions for Salsa:

Place all the ingredients in a bowl and mix with a hand blender.  Pulse a few times to add a juice to the salsa but avoid over mixing and making a sauce.  Salsa is chunky so avoid over blending.

After you have mixed the ingredients, add seasoning to taste and then let it sit for a few hours so the flavours can combine.

NOTE:  You can decide to add an egg or other protein to your avocado meal.  We talked before about eggs in an avocado which makes  a filling meal.  This recipe would also work really well with Chickpea chips.

 

photo of avocado by Makia Minich

Pumpkin Seeds Small Yet Pack a Punch

metabolic balance Coach Myra Nissen has been blogging on Livecleanmb. I thought you might enjoy this post by Myra about Pumkin seeds.

Live Clean MB

When some folks see “seed mix” as a breakfast on their plan, they think, “What is this? Bird food?” Some find it tough to get used to while other Metabolic balancers love the option.

The most common species of pumpkin used as a source of pumpkin seeds are Cucurbita pepo, Cucurbita maxima, Cucurbita moschata, and Cucurbita mixta.

PUMPKIN SEEDS AND HEALTH

Dr. Wolf has told us that pumpkin seeds have a strong therapeutic effect. Containing almost 50% fatty acids, minerals and trace elements such as manganese, zinc, copper and selenium. Pumpkin seeds contain a  diverse mixture of antioxidants  that may provide them with antioxidant-related properties not widely found in other foods.

Pumpkin seeds also contain phytosterols which have a good effect on the bladder and prostate.

Pumpkin seeds, pumpkin seed extracts, and pumpkin seed oil have long been valued for their anti-microbial benefits, including their anti-fungal…

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Roasted Tomato Squashetti – metabolic balance Monday Recipe

Over the weekend, we found a video of a vegan cooking challenge and one of the recipes was metabolic balance plan friendly so we decided to share it and omit the ingredients that would throw you off plan.

Ingredients:

  • Butternut squash
  • Mushrooms
  • Olive oil
  • Fresh basil
  • Cherry tomatoes
  • Plum tomatoes
  • garlic

Instructions:

Place all the tomatoes and garlic on a roasting tray and drizzle a bit of olive oil over the pan Add salt and pepper and mix ingredients until covered with oil and seasoning.  Roast for approximately 30 minutes.

Remove the tomatoes from the oven and place half of the tomatoes into a bowl (without the garlic just tomatoes.) Blend.  Add porcini mushrooms and basil.  Blend ingredients until smooth.

Peel a butternut squash and split/slice it in the middle.  Remove seeds.  Cut halves into half and place the sections on a spiraliser.  Saute the “noodles” in a pan with a bit of olive oil.   Add the tomato sauce and mix until the noodles are softened.

Place the noodle mixture on a plate and add remaining tomatoes.  Add rye croutons if desired.

Note:  There is no protein in this meal. If you would like, you may add a nut, a meat or a favourite cheese from your plan.  Or, if you want to be very European, have a cheese with your fruit for dessert and skip the protein in the main meal.

The inspiration recipe can be found here.

PS.  Spiralizers look like this. If you do not have one, use a food processor or julienne peeler.

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Treat Meals on the metabolic balance Plan

The goal of metabolic balance is to eat what makes sense for your body and your life, which means you need to learn to incorporate treat meals into your life because life doesn’t always go as planned.

For metabolic balance, a treat meal is a meal that is off your metabolic balance plan. As you progress through the metabolic balance program, more foods will be included in your plan and you may find yourself not using treat meals on a regular basis. Until that day arrives, you will find treat meals very useful for staying on track and on plan.

Planning a Treat Meal

The best way to begin planning for treat meals is to have a chat with your metabolic balance coach. You and your coach will build a general treat meal strategy for your treat meals.  If you have been seeing a coach for awhile, your coach will know your struggle areas and help you build a strategy to deal with treat meals, celebration and events including food.

With your coach, you can pre plan your treat meal by reviewing the menu and making your food choices in advance. By being prepared, you can control how far off program you go during the meal and change your eating for that day so that you stay as close to your plan as you can.

For example, if you are going to a restaurant but have not seen the menu, metabolic balance suggests eating proteins that you wouldn’t eat at a restaurant such as eggs or goat cheese.  Making this kind of choice allows you more flexibility when you’re reviewing the menu and reduces your stress about eating a treat meal.

Your Treat Meal

As always, metabolic balance encourages you to start your meal with a protein. Because you are outside your normal environment, you may not be served a protein first so make sure you are carrying a pouch of seeds in your purse.  Don’t bring more than a handful of seeds with you so that you are not overeating. You just want to make sure that the first thing in your stomach is a protein especially if you are planning to drink a glass of wine.   or another type of alcoholic beverage.

Once you have eating your protein, follow these metabolic balance tips:

  1. Relax and enjoy yourself. You are at a treat meal, enjoy the experience and don’t stress out about the little things you can’t control about your eating environment.
  2. Sit down and enjoy your food.   If you eat while talking or standing around, you may not realise how much food you have put into your mouth. Make the decision to eat mindfully for the evening and fully enjoy the experience and the food.
  3. Chew thoroughly.  You are not at a food race.  Pay attention to the food you are putting into your body and make the conscious decision to eat slowly and chew thoroughly.  Chewing thoroughly:
    1. Makes it easier for your body to absorb nutrients.
    2. Makes the meal last longer which allows the brain to realise that food has been consumed.
    3. Drink lots of water.
    4. Chewing is a good workout for your teeth.
    5. You will have less undigested food entering into your intestines.
    6. Chewing will allow you to really taste the food you are eating.

After you are finished with your treat meal, take a moment to savor the memory of the evening and then make the intention to begin your metabolic balance plan the next morning by setting out what you plan to eat for breakfast.  If you have issues that may crop up, discuss this with your metabolic balance coach and develop a positive after treat meal routine that you can follow.

Good luck with your treat meals and we look forward to sharing more recipes like Mondays Endive Soup recipe that lets you eat what makes sense and stay on plan.

 

Belgian Endive Soup with Smoked Eel – metabolic balance Monday Recipe

The original recipe calls for smoked eel. I’m not sure how readily available smoke eel is in your neighborhood you can order smoked eel online or use the alternate recipe I found on Immigrant’s table, where she added mushrooms to the soup.

Ingredients:

  • 1 Portion vegetables (Belgian endive, potatoes, sweet onions)
  • 1 Portion mushrooms (protein variety) / or 1 portion smoked eel
  • 1 Clove garlic
  • 250ml Vegetable broth
  • Salt and pepper
  • chives for garnish
  • Instructions:

Cut Belgian Endive into fine strips.

  • Slice onions into rings and cut potatoes into small cubes.
  • Press the garlic in a garlic press.
  • Place the vegetables in a pot with the vegetable broth and let cook for about fifteen minutes or until the potatoes are soft.
  • Puree the mixture and add seasoning to taste.
  • Saute the muschrooms in a little bit of olive oil and then cut into small pieces.
  • Add small pieces of Muschrooms to the soup. If you decided to use smoked eel, cut the smoked eel into small pieces and add to the soup.
  • Serve the soup with Rye Croutons or with a slice of metabolic balance rye bread.

NOTE:

If you want, you can substitute endive for Belgian endive. They are slightly different but will both work for this recipe.

 

 

 

 

Are You Having a Sad Desk Lunch?

Sad Desk Lunch (SDL) is a new term to describe the 65 percent of the workforce that eat lunch at their desks hoping to be more productive. (Prevention) Even though recent studies have shown that communal eating helps increase productivity and social bonding between employees many employees feel that skipping lunch shows they are more productive and dedicated to their work.

Here is the link to the Cornell summary which talkes about why groups that eat together perform better together. There are some downfalls to eating together but the positive aspects out way the negative. (Harvard Business Review.)

If you are self-employed or work in a small office where it isn’t possible to eat lunch with other people, there are several apps which will help you find people to share an afternoon meal.

The App LetsLunch taps into your Linkedin Profile to set up lunch meetings with people in your Linkedin network.

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Lets Lunch App

or Never Eat Alone, which helps co-workers find each other for an internal lunch partner.

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For a little bit of fun, watch these kids deal with lunches from past generations:

My favourite quote is “Thank you for the effort.”   Wouldn’t you love people to say that to you after you have created them a wonderful lunch or, have reached out to them to have lunch?